The Offhand Angel single work   poetry   "Five haloed numbers on her angel chart"
  • Author: Jan Owen http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/owen-jan
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 The Offhand Angel
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Poems : 1980-2008 Jan Owen , Elwood : John Leonard Press , 2008 Z1526900 2008 selected work poetry Elwood : John Leonard Press , 2008 pg. 326-328

Works about this Work

Jan Owen, The Offhand Angel: New and Selected Poems and Charles Baudelaire, Selected Poems from Les Fleurs Du Mal Alice Gorman , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 9 no. 2 2017;
'As an undergraduate in the 1980s, I took French translation classes with the famous Professor Colin Duckworth at Melbourne University. I was less impressed then than I am now at his story of sleeping in Voltaire’s own bed (sans Voltaire, needless to say); and we all did grow rather tired of hearing about Samuel Beckett, on whom he was a world authority. I had left university by the time he started acting in Neighbours; probably that would have impressed me most of all. However, his approach to language, as a writer, critic and translator, has stayed with me. He was superb at demonstrating the balance between accuracy and tone in the choice of words; how sometimes a less literal translation could more effectively capture meaning and mood. Nowhere is striking this balance more critical than in poetry.' (Introduction)
Jan Owen, The Offhand Angel: New and Selected Poems and Charles Baudelaire, Selected Poems from Les Fleurs Du Mal Alice Gorman , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 9 no. 2 2017;
'As an undergraduate in the 1980s, I took French translation classes with the famous Professor Colin Duckworth at Melbourne University. I was less impressed then than I am now at his story of sleeping in Voltaire’s own bed (sans Voltaire, needless to say); and we all did grow rather tired of hearing about Samuel Beckett, on whom he was a world authority. I had left university by the time he started acting in Neighbours; probably that would have impressed me most of all. However, his approach to language, as a writer, critic and translator, has stayed with me. He was superb at demonstrating the balance between accuracy and tone in the choice of words; how sometimes a less literal translation could more effectively capture meaning and mood. Nowhere is striking this balance more critical than in poetry.' (Introduction)
Last amended 12 May 2010 10:49:08
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