AustLit logo
Bi-centenary single work   poetry   "You men you men two hundred years ago"
Issue Details: First known date: 1988... 1988 Bi-centenary
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Social Alternatives vol. 7 no. 1 March 1988 Z593651 1988 periodical issue 1988 pg. 34

Works about this Work

Being Done to Again Clifford Watego , 1988 single work essay
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , March vol. 7 no. 1 1988; (p. 32-34)
'1988 will be like any other year when it comes to memorable occasions, with the opportunists already out in their droves snatching the chance to capitalise on fake glory. There is also a vast number of devout anti-Bi-centennialists hatching clever excuses to justify their "rip them off first before they rip us off anymore" attitude. For black writers this may be far more difficult to carry out than for their comrades in other artistic areas. Black screen-printers, actors, dancers, musicians, painters, and not to forget the small (often community-based) artefact enterprises, among other occupations, have the moral armoury to accept and get away with Bi-centenary money without compromising their principles. (Secretly, the money is despised but has a way of talking in 601 different languages in Australia nowadays.)'
Being Done to Again Clifford Watego , 1988 single work essay
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , March vol. 7 no. 1 1988; (p. 32-34)
'1988 will be like any other year when it comes to memorable occasions, with the opportunists already out in their droves snatching the chance to capitalise on fake glory. There is also a vast number of devout anti-Bi-centennialists hatching clever excuses to justify their "rip them off first before they rip us off anymore" attitude. For black writers this may be far more difficult to carry out than for their comrades in other artistic areas. Black screen-printers, actors, dancers, musicians, painters, and not to forget the small (often community-based) artefact enterprises, among other occupations, have the moral armoury to accept and get away with Bi-centenary money without compromising their principles. (Secretly, the money is despised but has a way of talking in 601 different languages in Australia nowadays.)'
Last amended 22 Dec 2009 13:42:06
X