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A Refreshing Sleep single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 A Refreshing Sleep
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Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Karroyul Kim Scott , ( dir. Kelrick Martin ) Australia : Spear Point Productions , 2015 8733237 2015 single work film/TV

'An Aboriginal girl, lost and empty after the death of her mother, discovers her past in an unlikely place.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Westerly vol. 54 no. 2 November Delys Bird (editor), Tony Hughes-d'Aeth (editor), Blaze Kwaymullina (editor), Sally Morgan (editor), 2009 Z1643069 2009 periodical issue

    'This unique edition of the Westerly provides a space for Aboriginal stories to be published and heard. There is a great diversity in the stories in this edition, some focus on family relationships, others on Country and some on the trauma of colonisation. A common theme is the subtle and often ironic sense of humour that threads through the collection, offering a sense of hope and resilience. The collection is thought-provoking, insightful, sad, funny, and full of those wonderful foibles that make us all human.' (Source: Editorial)

    2009
    pg. 37-48
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Best Australian Stories 2009 Delia Falconer (editor), Melbourne : Black Inc. , 2009 Z1652008 2009 anthology short story extract (taught in 2 units) Melbourne : Black Inc. , 2009 pg. 30-40
Alternative title: Sovande
Language: Swedish
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Australien berättar : drömtidens framtid : nitton noveller Lars Ahlström (editor), Lars Ahlström (translator), Sweden : 2009 Z1674252 2009 anthology short story Australia Says : Dream Tomorrow's Future : Nineteen Short Stories Sweden : 2009 pg. 177-191
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Where There's Smoke : Outstanding Short Stories by Australian Men Black Inc. (editor), Collingwood : Black Inc. , 2015 8700359 2015 anthology short story

    'Where There's Smoke presents outstanding short fiction by Australia's finest male writers. These are tales of love, secrets, doubt and torment, the everyday and the extraordinary.

    'A man sleeps at the site of a massacre and wakes refreshed. An unassuming piano tuner is sent off to contribute to the war effort. A woman with Alzheimer's is dragged along by her interfering son to visit Uluru.

    'Brilliant, shocking and profound, these tales will leave you reeling in ways that only a great short story can.

    'Chris Womersley Murray Bail Tim Winton Rodney Hall David Malouf Tony Birch Shane Maloney Ryan O'Neill Nam Le Kim Scott

    'and many more' (Publication summary)

    Collingwood : Black Inc. , 2015

Works about this Work

Six Groundings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Story in the Australian Creative Writing Classroom: Part 2 Paul Collis , Jen Crawford , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 22 no. 2 2018;

‘All Australian children deserve to know the country that they share through the stories that Aboriginal people can tell them,’ write Gladys Idjirrimoonra Milroy and Jill Milroy (2008: 42). If country and story, place and voice are intertwined, it is vital that we make space in Australian creative writing classrooms for the reading and writing of Australian Indigenous story. What principles and questions can allow us to begin? We propose six groundings for this work:

  1. Indigenous story is literary history, literary history is creative power.
  2. We do culture together: culture becomes in collaboration, conscious or unconscious.
  3. There is no such thing as Indigenous story, and yet it can be performed and known.
  4. Country speaks, to our conceptions of voice and point of view.
  5. History and memory are written in the land and on the body in bodies of practice.
  6. Story transmits narrative responsibility. Narrative responsibility requires fierce listening.

'This two-part paper discusses each of these groundings as orienting and motivating principles for work we do as teachers of introductory creative writing units at the University of Canberra. Part 1 discussed the first three groundings and was published in TEXT Vol 21, No 2, October 2017. Part 2 discusses the remaining three groundings.'  (Publication abstract)

Traumatic Landscapes : Inscribing Spectrality and Identity in Kim Scott's 'A Refreshing Sleep', 'Capture' and 'An Intimate Act' Lydia Saleh-Rofail , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott 2016; (p. 88-100)
Traumatic Landscapes : Inscribing Spectrality and Identity in Kim Scott's 'A Refreshing Sleep', 'Capture' and 'An Intimate Act' Lydia Saleh-Rofail , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott 2016; (p. 88-100)
Six Groundings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Story in the Australian Creative Writing Classroom: Part 2 Paul Collis , Jen Crawford , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 22 no. 2 2018;

‘All Australian children deserve to know the country that they share through the stories that Aboriginal people can tell them,’ write Gladys Idjirrimoonra Milroy and Jill Milroy (2008: 42). If country and story, place and voice are intertwined, it is vital that we make space in Australian creative writing classrooms for the reading and writing of Australian Indigenous story. What principles and questions can allow us to begin? We propose six groundings for this work:

  1. Indigenous story is literary history, literary history is creative power.
  2. We do culture together: culture becomes in collaboration, conscious or unconscious.
  3. There is no such thing as Indigenous story, and yet it can be performed and known.
  4. Country speaks, to our conceptions of voice and point of view.
  5. History and memory are written in the land and on the body in bodies of practice.
  6. Story transmits narrative responsibility. Narrative responsibility requires fierce listening.

'This two-part paper discusses each of these groundings as orienting and motivating principles for work we do as teachers of introductory creative writing units at the University of Canberra. Part 1 discussed the first three groundings and was published in TEXT Vol 21, No 2, October 2017. Part 2 discusses the remaining three groundings.'  (Publication abstract)

Awards

2010 winner Patricia Hackett Prize For best contribution to Westerly in 2009
Last amended 30 Aug 2012 15:53:26
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