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y separately published work icon Roll Back the Night single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1945... 1945 Roll Back the Night
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Robert Hale ,
      1945 .
      Extent: 185p.

Works about this Work

Communism Usurping Fascism : Political Propaganda in Jean Devanny’s Roll Back the Night and Dymphna Cusack’s Heat Wave in Berlin Kirril Shields , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 30 no. 1 2016; (p. 195-205)
'This essay explores two specific literary and thematic tropes apparent in Jean Devanny's Roll Back the Night (1945) and Dymphna Cusack's Heat Wave in Berlin (1961): first; depictions of the fascist victim and perpetrator that act as a means of didacticism and political pontification in an Australian context; second, each author's belief that the threat of fascism would engulf Australian and/or European politics post-Second World War. While the publication of the two texts is separated by almost two decades, I argue that their similarities highlight an Australian cultural naivety promoted by a geographic and socially removed Australian understanding of the Third Reich. This cultural specificity becomes apparent in Roll Back the Night and Heat Wave in Berlin through the texts' depictions of the Nazi period and the period's ensuing after-effects, drawing one-dimensional character representations of the communist victim and fascist perpetrator that serve not as a means of remembrance or understanding but as Communist propaganda aimed at an Australian audience. Similarly, the cultural and geographic distancing in the two texts is further noted—however influential these stories may or may not have been—in each author's attempts to combat what they suggest is the encroaching threat of the political Right in both Australian and European contexts. It is this lack of character development, alongside each author's political tone and their similar political concerns, that will be explored in this essay. ' (Introduction)
Communism Usurping Fascism : Political Propaganda in Jean Devanny’s Roll Back the Night and Dymphna Cusack’s Heat Wave in Berlin Kirril Shields , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 30 no. 1 2016; (p. 195-205)
'This essay explores two specific literary and thematic tropes apparent in Jean Devanny's Roll Back the Night (1945) and Dymphna Cusack's Heat Wave in Berlin (1961): first; depictions of the fascist victim and perpetrator that act as a means of didacticism and political pontification in an Australian context; second, each author's belief that the threat of fascism would engulf Australian and/or European politics post-Second World War. While the publication of the two texts is separated by almost two decades, I argue that their similarities highlight an Australian cultural naivety promoted by a geographic and socially removed Australian understanding of the Third Reich. This cultural specificity becomes apparent in Roll Back the Night and Heat Wave in Berlin through the texts' depictions of the Nazi period and the period's ensuing after-effects, drawing one-dimensional character representations of the communist victim and fascist perpetrator that serve not as a means of remembrance or understanding but as Communist propaganda aimed at an Australian audience. Similarly, the cultural and geographic distancing in the two texts is further noted—however influential these stories may or may not have been—in each author's attempts to combat what they suggest is the encroaching threat of the political Right in both Australian and European contexts. It is this lack of character development, alongside each author's political tone and their similar political concerns, that will be explored in this essay. ' (Introduction)
Last amended 3 Mar 2008 15:39:47
Subjects:
  • Coast,
  • Far North Queensland, Queensland,
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