6038859911665016089.jpg
Advertisement, Gundagai Independent, 5 October 1910, p.3
form y The Squatter's Daughter single work   film/TV  
Adaptation of The Squatter's Daughter, or, The Land of the Wattle Albert Edmunds 1907 single work drama
Issue Details: First known date: 1910... 1910 The Squatter's Daughter
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Set largely on a sheep station in rural Australia, the storyline concerns a rivalty between two neighbouring stations: Enderby (owned by Violet Enderby) and Waratah (owned by the Harringtons). In the elder Harrington's absence, his weak-willed son has been manipulated by the station overseer into attempting to bankrupt the Enderby station. The plan almost succeeds but is foiled by a stranger to the district, Archie McPherson. An additional storyline concerns the exploits of bushranger Ben Hall.

Exhibitions

7990306
7974092

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • c
      Australia,
      c
      :
      William Anderson ,
      1910 .
      6038859911665016089.jpg
      Advertisement, Gundagai Independent, 5 October 1910, p.3
      Extent: 6,000 ft (approx. 66 min.)p.
      Description: Black and white; sound

Works about this Work

The Pioneer Legend and Its Legacy : In Memory of John Hirst Richard Waterhouse , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society , June vol. 103 no. 1 2017; (p. 7-25)

'In a famous study, The Australian Legend, first published in 1958, Russel Ward argued that the bush legend was the central foundation story that explained the evolution of Australian character and nationalism. Ward's version of the legend explained how from convict times onwards itinerant bush workers had created and adhered to an ethos that encompassed mateship, anti-authoritarianism (including hostility to Britain and its empire), egalitarianism, and adaptability. Although the bush legend allegedly originated with and was nurtured by a bush proletariat, Ward proposed that this regional ethos became a national creed at the turn of the 20th century, transmitted from rural to urban Australia through conduits that included the trade union movement, periodicals like The Bulletin, and the work of writers like Lawson and Paterson. (Publication abstract)

The Pioneer Legend and Its Legacy : In Memory of John Hirst Richard Waterhouse , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society , June vol. 103 no. 1 2017; (p. 7-25)

'In a famous study, The Australian Legend, first published in 1958, Russel Ward argued that the bush legend was the central foundation story that explained the evolution of Australian character and nationalism. Ward's version of the legend explained how from convict times onwards itinerant bush workers had created and adhered to an ethos that encompassed mateship, anti-authoritarianism (including hostility to Britain and its empire), egalitarianism, and adaptability. Although the bush legend allegedly originated with and was nurtured by a bush proletariat, Ward proposed that this regional ethos became a national creed at the turn of the 20th century, transmitted from rural to urban Australia through conduits that included the trade union movement, periodicals like The Bulletin, and the work of writers like Lawson and Paterson. (Publication abstract)

Last amended 14 Aug 2014 09:04:05
Subjects:
  • Bush,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
  • ca. 1900-1910
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