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Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 Time and Memory in the Novels of Eleanor Dark
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In this thesis I will demonstrate that Eleanor Dark's over-riding themes are time and memory. Time informs the structure of her novels, she juxtaposes past and present. Memory in all its aspects, personal, cultural, racial dominates both her contemporary novels and The Timeless Land trilogy. The thesis considers Dark's fiction in sequence to chart her treatment oftime and memory.

'Simultaneously Dark was reaching into her own reservoir of memory and transfiguring her own experience in the characters, events and locations of her novels. In this oblique way, and through this unique form of modelling, Dark reveals little known areas of her life. Biographically Dark remains elusive; the surface events of her life are well documented but do not account for the drama of her character portrayals, the immediacy of her perceptions of the natural world, her deep intellectual responses to art, literature and politics, as well as her preoccupation with time.

'It is my contention that Dark's creative thrust was inwards; she developed the inner processes of memory and imagination. Time and memory cohere in her novels; under scrutiny they bring new interpretations to her work, and new insights into her life.' (Author's abstract)

Notes

  • PhD thesis, University of New South Wales.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      Kensington, Randwick area, Sydney Eastern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: 2009 .
      Link: U6437Web resource Sighted: 09/06/2009
      Extent: 312p.
      Description: illus., ports
      Note/s:
      • Bibliography: pp.307-312.
      • This thesis is licensed under a 'Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs Licence'. It is available online providing copyright provisions are met. See UNSWWorks website for further details: http://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Copyright

Works about this Work

Biopolitics and Eleanor Dark's Prelude to Christopher Anne Maxwell , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 76-90)
'In 1934 Miles Franklin described Eleanor Dark's second novel, Prelude to Christopher, as 'a terribly beautiful piece of work' (128). One of Dark's earliest critics, Franklin attributed the book's strength to the author's deft handling of a tragic theme and 'the urge to speak the naked truth' (125). Later critics emphasised the book's experimental style, especially its skilled handling o the multiple viewpoints, flashbacks and interior monologues associated with high modernism. By contrast, recent critics have focused on the novel's subject matter and Dark's engagement with the biopolitical norms that manifested in eugenics. This essay pursues that focus. It aims to flesh out the ways in which Dark's novel registers the potential impact of eugenics on liberal conceptions of freedom and to explore some of the ways in which it attempts to reclaim that freedom...(' From author's introduction p. 76)
Abuse as a Muse Susan Wyndham , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6-7 June 2009; (p. 37)
Abuse as a Muse Susan Wyndham , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6-7 June 2009; (p. 37)
Biopolitics and Eleanor Dark's Prelude to Christopher Anne Maxwell , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 76-90)
'In 1934 Miles Franklin described Eleanor Dark's second novel, Prelude to Christopher, as 'a terribly beautiful piece of work' (128). One of Dark's earliest critics, Franklin attributed the book's strength to the author's deft handling of a tragic theme and 'the urge to speak the naked truth' (125). Later critics emphasised the book's experimental style, especially its skilled handling o the multiple viewpoints, flashbacks and interior monologues associated with high modernism. By contrast, recent critics have focused on the novel's subject matter and Dark's engagement with the biopolitical norms that manifested in eugenics. This essay pursues that focus. It aims to flesh out the ways in which Dark's novel registers the potential impact of eugenics on liberal conceptions of freedom and to explore some of the ways in which it attempts to reclaim that freedom...(' From author's introduction p. 76)
Last amended 10 Jun 2009 09:50:01
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