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This image has been sourced from online.
Issue Details: First known date: 1989... 1989 The Black Diggers : Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Second World War
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Black Diggers explores the war effort of Aboriginal and Islander Australians during the Second World War and the reasons their contribution has gone unrecognised for so long.' This book is a comprehensive account of the work of Indigenous Australians 'during the years when their country faced the Japanese threat. Despite suspicion and prejudice they earned a place within the digger legend'. (Source: Back cover, Aboriginal Studies Press, 1997 edition)

Exhibitions

8184446

Notes

  • Dedication: To Australia's Aboriginal and Islander servicemen and women
  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney,: Allen and Unwin , 1989 .
      4901389266216127866.png
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xv, 228p.p.
      Description: illus., maps, ports.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliography and index.
      ISBN: 004520005X (pbk)

Works about this Work

Introduction : Diversifying the Black Diggers' Histories Noah Riseman , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , December vol. 39 no. 2015; (p. 137-142)
The author talks about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders' experiences of war.
Rectifying 'the Great Australian Silence'? Creative Representations of Australian Indigenous Second World War Service Noah Riseman , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2012; (p. 35-48)

'Until the publication of Robert Hall's landmark book The Black Diggers in 1989, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were essentially 'written out' of Australia's Second World War history. Still, more than 20 years since the publication of Hall's book, Australian Indigenous participation in the war effort as servicemen and women, labourers and scouts, in wartime industries and in various other capacities, continues to be on the periphery of Australia's war history. The Second World War remains part of what WEH Stanner referred to in 1969 as 'the Great Australian Silence' of Indigenous history. Notwithstanding the lack of significant academic histories of Indigenous military history, there have been a few creative depictions of Aboriginal participation in the Second World War. Both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people have used creative mediums, such as poetry, short fiction, film, musical theatre and music, to portray Aboriginal Second World War service. This paper examines these creative cultural representations and how they position Australian Indigenous war service within a wider narrative of the Second World War and Indigenous history. Though the portrayals of Aboriginal service vary, the majority of creative works present the Second World War as central to Australian Indigenous history. Moreover, the creative representations depict Indigenous servicemen's hopes for a better life after the war, only to be crushed when they returned to ongoing discrimination. Even so, the creative depictions use the Second World War as an early marker of reconciliation in Australia, portraying the conflict as a time when ideals of liberty and equality overruled prejudice to unite Australia. Such a message continues to resonate, as creative representations of the Second World War contribute to contemporary understandings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander citizenship and reconciliation.' (Publication abstract)

Untitled Richard Broome , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , April vol. 24 no. 96 1991; (p. 455-491)

— Review of The Black Diggers : Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Second World War Robert A. Hall 1989 single work prose
[Review Essay] The Black Diggers : Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Second World War John Curwen Horner , 1990 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 1990; (p. 55-57)

'Both text and photographs of The Black Diggers are a revelation. This is the first comprehensive account written of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service men and women of World War II. Among the many photographs there are two of Leonard Waters from Nindigully, South Queensland, an Aboriginal combat pilot who served in Borneo. Aboriginal ground crewmen also served in Northern Australia. Soldiers who went overseas, having enlisted early in the war, included the late Reg Saunders (promoted to Sergeant in mid-1940, and to Lieutenant late in 1944), and Stewart Murray (a Corporal in 1945). Islanders included Charles Mene, Victor Blanco and Ted Loban. Oodgeroo Noonuccal was an AWAS signaler, but Neville Bonner and Willie Thaiday were turned away as recruits, owing to military racial prejudice.'  (Introduction)

Untitled Richard Broome , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , April vol. 24 no. 96 1991; (p. 455-491)

— Review of The Black Diggers : Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Second World War Robert A. Hall 1989 single work prose
Rectifying 'the Great Australian Silence'? Creative Representations of Australian Indigenous Second World War Service Noah Riseman , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2012; (p. 35-48)

'Until the publication of Robert Hall's landmark book The Black Diggers in 1989, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were essentially 'written out' of Australia's Second World War history. Still, more than 20 years since the publication of Hall's book, Australian Indigenous participation in the war effort as servicemen and women, labourers and scouts, in wartime industries and in various other capacities, continues to be on the periphery of Australia's war history. The Second World War remains part of what WEH Stanner referred to in 1969 as 'the Great Australian Silence' of Indigenous history. Notwithstanding the lack of significant academic histories of Indigenous military history, there have been a few creative depictions of Aboriginal participation in the Second World War. Both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people have used creative mediums, such as poetry, short fiction, film, musical theatre and music, to portray Aboriginal Second World War service. This paper examines these creative cultural representations and how they position Australian Indigenous war service within a wider narrative of the Second World War and Indigenous history. Though the portrayals of Aboriginal service vary, the majority of creative works present the Second World War as central to Australian Indigenous history. Moreover, the creative representations depict Indigenous servicemen's hopes for a better life after the war, only to be crushed when they returned to ongoing discrimination. Even so, the creative depictions use the Second World War as an early marker of reconciliation in Australia, portraying the conflict as a time when ideals of liberty and equality overruled prejudice to unite Australia. Such a message continues to resonate, as creative representations of the Second World War contribute to contemporary understandings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander citizenship and reconciliation.' (Publication abstract)

Introduction : Diversifying the Black Diggers' Histories Noah Riseman , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , December vol. 39 no. 2015; (p. 137-142)
The author talks about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders' experiences of war.
[Review Essay] The Black Diggers : Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders in the Second World War John Curwen Horner , 1990 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 1990; (p. 55-57)

'Both text and photographs of The Black Diggers are a revelation. This is the first comprehensive account written of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service men and women of World War II. Among the many photographs there are two of Leonard Waters from Nindigully, South Queensland, an Aboriginal combat pilot who served in Borneo. Aboriginal ground crewmen also served in Northern Australia. Soldiers who went overseas, having enlisted early in the war, included the late Reg Saunders (promoted to Sergeant in mid-1940, and to Lieutenant late in 1944), and Stewart Murray (a Corporal in 1945). Islanders included Charles Mene, Victor Blanco and Ted Loban. Oodgeroo Noonuccal was an AWAS signaler, but Neville Bonner and Willie Thaiday were turned away as recruits, owing to military racial prejudice.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 1 Dec 2014 15:15:28
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