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Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y separately published work icon Take Power anthology   Indigenous story  
Alternative title: Take Power, Like This Old Man Here : An Anthology of Writings Celebrating Twenty Years of Land Rights in Central Australia, 1977-1997
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 Take Power
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Take Power is a resounding tribute, to the strength of traditional Aboriginal law and culture and to the workers for land rights who have helped shape the social and political landscape of the nation.' (Source: TROVE)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,: IAD Press , 1998 .
      image of person or book cover 1325998451855497348.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: xv, 366p.
      Description: illus., ports, maps.
      ISBN: 1864650052 (pbk.), 1864650052

Works about this Work

The Power and Purpose of Literature : Boisbouvier Oration 2018 Alexis Wright , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 77 no. 4 2018; (p. 209-218)

'I thought I would begin this talk about the power and purpose of literature by talking about my 1998 book Take Power. The title came from a Gurindji Elder while telling the story of the ten-year battle his people fought against Vestey’s, a British pastoral company that owned the Wave Hill pastoral property in the north-west of the Northern Territory, when in 1966, 200 Gurindji, the traditional landowners, walked off the cattle station where they worked on their stolen lands because of the harsh treatment they were receiving from the management of the pastoral property. Vincent Lingiari, who led his people off Wave Hill, said: ‘We can’t go back to that Vestey’s. Vestey’s been treating me like a walagu (dog). Make mefella worry.’ The Gurindji kept telling their story straight, and eventually they achieved land rights over part of their traditional lands.' (Introduction)

Author is Made of the Wright Stuff 2010 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 21 January vol. 9 no. 193 2010; (p. 34)
Author is Made of the Wright Stuff 2010 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 21 January vol. 9 no. 193 2010; (p. 34)
The Power and Purpose of Literature : Boisbouvier Oration 2018 Alexis Wright , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 77 no. 4 2018; (p. 209-218)

'I thought I would begin this talk about the power and purpose of literature by talking about my 1998 book Take Power. The title came from a Gurindji Elder while telling the story of the ten-year battle his people fought against Vestey’s, a British pastoral company that owned the Wave Hill pastoral property in the north-west of the Northern Territory, when in 1966, 200 Gurindji, the traditional landowners, walked off the cattle station where they worked on their stolen lands because of the harsh treatment they were receiving from the management of the pastoral property. Vincent Lingiari, who led his people off Wave Hill, said: ‘We can’t go back to that Vestey’s. Vestey’s been treating me like a walagu (dog). Make mefella worry.’ The Gurindji kept telling their story straight, and eventually they achieved land rights over part of their traditional lands.' (Introduction)

Last amended 20 Aug 2014 15:42:23
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