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y separately published work icon I Love You Bro' single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 I Love You Bro'
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Johnny is a digital chameleon, able to change who he is with the stroke of a key and the click of a mouse — a skill he puts to use in an online chatroom. Posing as a girl, under the screen name AlbaJay, Johnny stumbles across someone he knows from his real life, a boy from school, MarkyMark.

'The two begin a digital relationship, but as the fictional world he has created starts to collide with reality, Johnny must do whatever it takes to make sure MarkyMark still loves him.

'Based on true events, I Love You, Bro is a tale of love and deceit in a digital world.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Production Details

  • First produced at the Lithuanian Club, North Melbourne, Victoria, presented by the Melbourne Fringe Festival 2007, 28 October 2007. Directed by Yvonne Virsik. Subsequently produced at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2008.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2007
    • Fortitude Valley, Fortitude Valley - New Farm area, Brisbane - North East, Brisbane, Queensland,: Playlab , 2014 .
      image of person or book cover 5406404583361775916.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 47p.p.
      ISBN: 9781921390647
      Series: Playlab Indie Playlab (publisher), series - publisher

Works about this Work

Digital Alchemy : The Posthuman Drama of Adam J.A. Cass's I Love You, Bro Richard Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , December no. 65 2014; (p. 37-52)
'The definition of a 'digital performance' remains contested. Steve Dixon has defined the field as 'performance works where computer technologies play a key role rather than a subsidiary one in content, techniques, aesthetics, or delivery forms'. The inclusion of the word 'or' is crucial here. Under this definition, a theatre performance about computer technologies would still earn the definition of 'digital performance', whether those technologies were used on stage or not. Yet for Dixon and others, this has not proved to be the case. The trend in theatre scholarship exploring digital themes has overwhelmingly tended towards the final three categories of Dixon's definition: an emphasis on 'techniques, aesthetics, or delivery forms' to evoke a digital mise-en-scene. Implicit here is a wider emphasis on 'liveness' over 'content' in contemporary theatre scholarship, which Hans-Thies Lehmann observed as rift between 'theatre' and 'drama'. While digital 'theatre' has been the main focus of scholarly inquiry to date, this article aims to redress this imbalance, by presenting a critique of the Australian one-man play I Love You, Bro by Adam J.A. Cass (2007) via the 'drama' of the performance text itself. In so doing, I make the case for an alternative method of classifying digital performance - one in which a digital mise-en-scene may be evoked via the playwright's construction of identity within a technoscientific narrative. To anchor this approach, I employ the theoretical construct of the 'posthuman' - a figure that represents a compelling nexus for contemporary anxieties about the digital age.' (Publication summary)
Theatre 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 June 2012; (p. 9)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
One-Act Hit a Must-See Peter Wilkins , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 May 2012; (p. 8)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
Reality Toned Down in Play about Brotherly Love Ron Cerabona , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 16 May 2012; (p. 7)
Infatuation Online Ron Cerabona , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 11 May 2012; (p. 7)
A Mixed-Up Kid in the Shadowy Dangers of Cyberspace Alison Croggon , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 16 February 2009; (p. 9)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
Netted in a Web of Teen Fiction Robin Usher , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 12 February 2009; (p. 28)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
The Net Shall Set You Free Cameron Woodhead , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 17 February 2009; (p. 16)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
Untitled John Bailey , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 22 February 2009; (p. 22)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
Network Muse Jane Scott , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 21 - 27 July no. 793 2010; (p. 25)

— Review of I Love You Bro' Adam J. A. Cass , 2007 single work drama
Spotlight Falls on Theatre Nathanael Cooper , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 14 February 2011; (p. 45)
Infatuation Online Ron Cerabona , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 11 May 2012; (p. 7)
Reality Toned Down in Play about Brotherly Love Ron Cerabona , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 16 May 2012; (p. 7)
Digital Alchemy : The Posthuman Drama of Adam J.A. Cass's I Love You, Bro Richard Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , December no. 65 2014; (p. 37-52)
'The definition of a 'digital performance' remains contested. Steve Dixon has defined the field as 'performance works where computer technologies play a key role rather than a subsidiary one in content, techniques, aesthetics, or delivery forms'. The inclusion of the word 'or' is crucial here. Under this definition, a theatre performance about computer technologies would still earn the definition of 'digital performance', whether those technologies were used on stage or not. Yet for Dixon and others, this has not proved to be the case. The trend in theatre scholarship exploring digital themes has overwhelmingly tended towards the final three categories of Dixon's definition: an emphasis on 'techniques, aesthetics, or delivery forms' to evoke a digital mise-en-scene. Implicit here is a wider emphasis on 'liveness' over 'content' in contemporary theatre scholarship, which Hans-Thies Lehmann observed as rift between 'theatre' and 'drama'. While digital 'theatre' has been the main focus of scholarly inquiry to date, this article aims to redress this imbalance, by presenting a critique of the Australian one-man play I Love You, Bro by Adam J.A. Cass (2007) via the 'drama' of the performance text itself. In so doing, I make the case for an alternative method of classifying digital performance - one in which a digital mise-en-scene may be evoked via the playwright's construction of identity within a technoscientific narrative. To anchor this approach, I employ the theoretical construct of the 'posthuman' - a figure that represents a compelling nexus for contemporary anxieties about the digital age.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 3 Oct 2017 13:37:40
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