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y separately published work icon Home and Away single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Home and Away
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Mum is a rehab counselor for people with alcohol problems. Grandma Raynor lives next door. Dad is a driver for Elgas. Then there's me, fifteen, into a lot of different stuff. Music, surfing, animals, tennis, swimming, computer games. And my sister, Claire, and brother Toby. We're a typical Australian family. Barbeques, footy, gardening, school, Holden Commodores. Then one day things change. April 26, Dad burns the toast, yells at Toby, thanks me for cleaning the cab of the truck, kisses Mum and Toby, then he's gone. April 27, the war starts. May 21, the city's in ruins, blackouts nearly all the time, food is hard to find. September 13, Dad's heard news of a boat. We might get out of here yet. September 28, it is just after dawn. A boat from their Navy has found us. We waved and cried and cheered. But then, slowly, we realised they were shouting at us, telling us to go away. September 30, we are in a huge prison, with razor wire all around us. The government says there's no room for us. The Prime Minister says that if they let us out into the community it'll just encourage other illegal immigrants. The Deputy Prime Minister says we're not genuine refugees. The Minister for Immigration says we should have gone through the proper procedures and applied to come here the prescribed way. Apparently there was a queue or a waiting list or something, and we were meant to find an Immigration Office and put our names down to be considered. I guess they're right. I feel terrible about the trouble we've caused them. (Source: Backcover)

Exhibitions

9563074

Notes

  • Included in the 2009 White Ravens Catalogue compiled by the International Youth Library in Munich Germany. Special mention; International understanding.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Lothian , 2013 .
      image of person or book cover 734201548380874618.jpeg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website
      Extent: 40p.
      Description: illus. (some col.)
      Note/s:
      • Published 12 November 2013
      ISBN: 9780734415523

Works about this Work

The Politics of Picture Books : Stories of Displaced Children in Twenty-first-century Australia Mary Tomsic , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 15 no. 2 2018; (p. 339-356)

'This article uses cultural representations to write refugee history. It examines twenty-first-century picture books about displaced children, alongside published responses to them, to explore how refugee experiences and histories are constructed, both for and about children, in an Australian context. The visual literary form of picture books as political texts is examined as a space for discussion and dialogue. Published responses to them, however, more commonly reveal rigid interpretations of imagined readers, invoking binary divisions between displaced and non-displaced children. Through these sources, questions of humanisation and (de)politicisations in refugee history are considered.'  (Publication abstract)

Writing for Good in the Contemporary Novel of Purpose Alice Robinson , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 29 September 2015;
Visual Identities : Australianness in Australian Picture Books Pam Macintyre , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 352-368)
‘The literature written for young people can be a vehicle for mediating change in mainstream attitudes, or it can confirm existing values. As with all literature, it carries ideologies. In this chapter, I will focus on the picture book, which constructs its meanings through dual visual and written texts. In particular, I will analyse selected, recent award-winning Australian picture books for their representations of ‘Australianness’.’ (From author’s introduction, p. 352)
[Review] Home and Away Joy Lawn , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 23 no. 1 2009; (p. 42)

— Review of Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges Report 2009 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 4-10)
Under Age Ruth Atkinson , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 21 September 2008; (p. 33)

— Review of Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book
Well-Tuned Tales Meg Sorensen , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 27-28 September 2008; (p. 37)

— Review of Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book ; Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
Children's Books Bernadette Condren , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 20 - 21 September 2008; (p. 25)

— Review of Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book
Learning to Deal with Death Stephanie Owen Reeder , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 4 October 2008; (p. 18)

— Review of The Dog on the Tuckerbox Corinne Fenton , 2008 single work picture book ; Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book ; Mending Lucille Jennifer Poulter , 2008 single work picture book
Kid's Lit Rosemary Neill , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25-26 October 2008; (p. 10)

— Review of Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges Report 2009 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 4-10)
Visual Identities : Australianness in Australian Picture Books Pam Macintyre , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 352-368)
‘The literature written for young people can be a vehicle for mediating change in mainstream attitudes, or it can confirm existing values. As with all literature, it carries ideologies. In this chapter, I will focus on the picture book, which constructs its meanings through dual visual and written texts. In particular, I will analyse selected, recent award-winning Australian picture books for their representations of ‘Australianness’.’ (From author’s introduction, p. 352)
Writing for Good in the Contemporary Novel of Purpose Alice Robinson , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 29 September 2015;
The Politics of Picture Books : Stories of Displaced Children in Twenty-first-century Australia Mary Tomsic , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 15 no. 2 2018; (p. 339-356)

'This article uses cultural representations to write refugee history. It examines twenty-first-century picture books about displaced children, alongside published responses to them, to explore how refugee experiences and histories are constructed, both for and about children, in an Australian context. The visual literary form of picture books as political texts is examined as a space for discussion and dialogue. Published responses to them, however, more commonly reveal rigid interpretations of imagined readers, invoking binary divisions between displaced and non-displaced children. Through these sources, questions of humanisation and (de)politicisations in refugee history are considered.'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 31 Dec 2013 11:08:46
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