AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 8659919639949814809.jpg
y separately published work icon D'harawal Seasons and Climatic Cycles single work   prose   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 D'harawal Seasons and Climatic Cycles
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This book is written for children, to bring understanding to their young minds that climate change is not just a recent affliction, but rather a continuous event. What is the affliction is that which modern society's commercialisation and industrialisation have done to natural climate change.' ...

'The Times of Day have been described first, followed by the Annual Season Cycle, and how the European seasons fit within the D'harawal Year; included within this section is the activity of animals and plants, triggered by the climatic conditions of each season. This is followed by the minor cycles which have an impact on D'harawal life, then the longer-term fluctuations in climate. Stories are included to illustrate how important knowledge of the weather and climate fluctuations was to the D'harawal Peoples' (pp. 7, 9).

Notes

  • Dedication: This book is dedicated to the loving memory of my beloved cousin and senior sister Beryl Beller Timbery without whom this book could not have been conceived, and who passed away before she was able to see it completed.
  • From the Introduction: 'With this study, information was gathered from many people about the seasons and climatic cycles, and a pattern of information protection appeared. Each family has knowledge about a particular season or cycle, but each family member has different knowledge about that season or cycle. That knowledge was then passed on to the person of choice, not necessarily of direct descent, but a person interested in receiving that knowledge, and a person who was a member of the extended family. Tracing that knowledge was the task, because many of these knowledgeholders had 'disappeared' after children had been taken away from them or from friends or relatives.

    'Having had extensive discussions with community members, it seems that the best way to begin collecting this knowledge was to try to find those people who had disappeared - the Dudbaya'ora - the Hidden Ones.

    'The search began, and this book is the result' (p. 7).

  • The publication was funded by the Commonwealth Government's Natural Heritage Trust, Envirofund community grants program.
  • Launched at Campbelltown College of TAFE, NSW, 15 August, 2008.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      Sydney, New South Wales,: 2008 .
      image of person or book cover 8659919639949814809.jpg
      Extent: 109p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 9780980481013

Works about this Work

How Do We Define the Climate Change Novel? Deborah Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate Change Narratives in Australian Fiction 2014; (p. 33-40)
'How do we best define a climate change novel? Given the complexities of climate change, as a real, scientific and cultural phenomenon, global warming demands a corresponding degree of complexity in fictional representation. Recent popular debates here and overseas raise further questions about what exactly constitutes a climate change novel. Does a climate change novel need to be set in the present? Or set in the future? Set during the time of climate change and extreme weather events, and the associated food scarcity and water wars, or can it be well after that —such as George Turner’s iconic The Sea and Summer? Are these novels best framed in context of utopian studies and science fiction studies? Andrew Milner has contextualised The Sea and Summer in terms of understanding the history of Australian science-fictional dystopias. For him, science fiction, whether utopian or dystopian , is ‘as good a place as any’ for ‘thought experiments about the politics of climate change’. He rejects the widespread ‘academic prejudice in literary studies against science fiction dystopias’ arguing that science fiction cannot readily be assimilated into either high literature or popular fiction (as genre). ' (33)
Untitled Lynne Babbage , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 42)

— Review of D'harawal Seasons and Climatic Cycles Frances Bodkin , 2008 single work prose
Aboriginal Insights For Kids Laurel-Lee Roderick , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Illawarra Mercury , 8 September 2009; (p. 15)
Two schools in Shellharbour and two schools in Wollongong will be part of a pilot program to bring natural environment and Dreaming stories into the education system. The project, Our D'harawal Dreaming is based on the ideas in Frances Bodkin's book D'harawal Seasons and Climatic Cycles.
Untitled Lynne Babbage , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 42)

— Review of D'harawal Seasons and Climatic Cycles Frances Bodkin , 2008 single work prose
Aboriginal Insights For Kids Laurel-Lee Roderick , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Illawarra Mercury , 8 September 2009; (p. 15)
Two schools in Shellharbour and two schools in Wollongong will be part of a pilot program to bring natural environment and Dreaming stories into the education system. The project, Our D'harawal Dreaming is based on the ideas in Frances Bodkin's book D'harawal Seasons and Climatic Cycles.
How Do We Define the Climate Change Novel? Deborah Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate Change Narratives in Australian Fiction 2014; (p. 33-40)
'How do we best define a climate change novel? Given the complexities of climate change, as a real, scientific and cultural phenomenon, global warming demands a corresponding degree of complexity in fictional representation. Recent popular debates here and overseas raise further questions about what exactly constitutes a climate change novel. Does a climate change novel need to be set in the present? Or set in the future? Set during the time of climate change and extreme weather events, and the associated food scarcity and water wars, or can it be well after that —such as George Turner’s iconic The Sea and Summer? Are these novels best framed in context of utopian studies and science fiction studies? Andrew Milner has contextualised The Sea and Summer in terms of understanding the history of Australian science-fictional dystopias. For him, science fiction, whether utopian or dystopian , is ‘as good a place as any’ for ‘thought experiments about the politics of climate change’. He rejects the widespread ‘academic prejudice in literary studies against science fiction dystopias’ arguing that science fiction cannot readily be assimilated into either high literature or popular fiction (as genre). ' (33)
Last amended 27 Apr 2018 14:47:57
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X