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y separately published work icon Nobody Owns the Moon single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Nobody Owns the Moon
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Clive, the fox, lives in the city. He is just trying to get by, trying to fit in. His friend Humphrey the donkey is also trying to make a living in the big city. But Humphreys not faring so well he sleeps on streets, or under statues, and he rarely finds things to eat. Then they find a mysterious envelope with free tickets to the theatre. Its something they have never experienced before, and it helps Clive and Humphrey rediscover their love for their city.'--Publisher.

Adaptations

y separately published work icon Nobody Owns the Moon Michael Barlow , Noriko Nashimoto , 2016 14002491 2016 single work drama

'Meet the inhabitants of an enchanted city, a place where rich and poor live side by side, as everyone comes together for one magical night at the theatre.

'With hand puppets, marionettes and masks Nobody Owns the Moon with make you think twice about the place you live, and might even encourage you to stop and say hello to your neighbour.'

Source: Spare Parts Puppet Theatre.

Notes

  • This is affiliated with Dr Laurel Cohn's Picture Book Diet because it contains representations of food and/or food practices.

    Food depiction
    • Incidental
    Food types
    • Everyday foods
    • Everyday drinks
    • Discretionary foods
    • Discretionary drinks
    • High sugar foods
    Food practices
    • Eating out - meal
    • Eating out - snack
    • Food selling
    • Food serving
    Gender
    • Food selling - male
    • Food serving - male [waiter]
    Signage n/a
    Positive/negative value n/a
    Food as sense of place
    • Domestic
    • Urban
    Setting
    • Urban landscape
    Food as social cohesion
    • Rituals
    Food as cultural identity n/a
    Food as character identity n/a
    Food as language n/a

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Viking , 2008 .
      image of person or book cover 5156995648731050804.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 29p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Reprinted: 2011
      ISBN: 9780670071609 (hbk.)
    • Kew East, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Berbay Books , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 2669684787772584775.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 1vp.
      Note/s:
      • Published April 2019

      ISBN: 9780994384195

Works about this Work

Ten Years On Allison Paterson Revisits a Modern Classic : Nobody Owns the Moon Allison Paterson , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 34 no. 2 2019; (p. 8)

— Review of Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
'Great picture books are rare. For good reason. To define their qualities, perhaps one could start with what they are not. They are not fashionable, because, while fashions come and go, their appeal remains constant. They are not imitative. They are not literal or prosaic. They are not cynical or clever. Their precise meanings are not easily grasped, but they are always meaningful. They are not easily forgotten.' (Tohby Riddle, 2019)
y separately published work icon Playing with Picturebooks : Postmodernism and the Postmodernesque Cherie Allan , Houndmills : Palgrave Macmillan , 2012 Z1909588 2012 single work criticism "Postmodernism has played a significant part in the development of playful and experimental picturebooks for children over the past 50 years. Playing with Picturebooks offers fresh insights into the continuing influence of postmodernism on picturebooks for children, covering a wide range of international picturebooks predominantly from the 1980s to the present. It represents a significant contribution to current debates centred on the decline of the effects of postmodernism on fiction and detects a shift from the postmodern to the postmodernesque. Playing with Picturebooks draws on a wide range of critical perspectives in examining postmodern approaches to narrative and illustration. Chapters discuss how metafictive devices enable different modes of representation, offer different perspectives to authorised version of history, and promote difference and ex-centricity over unity. Playing with Picturebooks is essential reading, not only for academics in the field of children's literature, but also for researchers, teachers and students." (Back cover)
Visual Identities : Australianness in Australian Picture Books Pam Macintyre , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 352-368)
‘The literature written for young people can be a vehicle for mediating change in mainstream attitudes, or it can confirm existing values. As with all literature, it carries ideologies. In this chapter, I will focus on the picture book, which constructs its meanings through dual visual and written texts. In particular, I will analyse selected, recent award-winning Australian picture books for their representations of ‘Australianness’.’ (From author’s introduction, p. 352)
[Review] Nobody Owns the Moon Jenny Charlton , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 23 no. 1 2009; (p. 46)

— Review of Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges Report 2009 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 4-10)
[Review] Nobody Owns the Moon Margaret Hamilton , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , August vol. 88 no. 2 2008; (p. 21)

— Review of Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
Well-Tuned Tales Meg Sorensen , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 27-28 September 2008; (p. 37)

— Review of Home and Away John Marsden , 2008 single work picture book ; Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
Enigmatic Visual Experiences Stephanie Owen Reeder , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 8 November 2008; (p. 18)

— Review of Just Jack Jane Tanner , 2008 single work picture book ; Enigma : A Magical Mystery Graeme Base , 2008 single work children's fiction ; The Art of Graeme Base Julie Watts , 2008 single work criticism ; The Cloudchasers David Richardson , 2008 single work children's fiction ; Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
[Review] Nobody Owns the Moon Moira Robinson , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 23 no. 4 2008; (p. 32)

— Review of Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
[Review] Nobody Owns the Moon John Nolan , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 52 no. 3 2008; (p. 28-29)

— Review of Nobody Owns the Moon Tohby Riddle , 2008 single work picture book
Know the Author/Illustrator: An Enigma Wrapped in a Riddle, Tohby Riddle James Roy , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies: Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 24 no. 4 2009; (p. 8-11)
Tohby Riddle says his early career as a cartoonist at The Good Weekend was instrumental in developing his 'a habit for looking for ideas and generating them through different ways of thinking' (8). An 'art school graduate with an interest in architecture' city-scapes, buildings, and alleys form a common link in his work, a fascination Riddle says, 'began from the age of twelve or thirteen, when we moved closer to the city from a fairly bushy area north of Sydney Harbour' (9). Roy points out that Riddle's work conveys 'a certain lightness and joy' that makes his urban landscapes 'light and myterious' rather than'dark and unnerving' which Riddle arrtibutes to his love of cities eventually developing into an interest in 'the archetypal metropolis' (9-10). Riddle says, "I want my cities to appear as places where so many things are going on at once rather than some type of dystopian nightmare...reality is ambiguous and random and chaotic, and if you can just get a nice authentic slice of that into a book, then it bears repreated readings, repeated discussions about the possibilities of the meanings...' (10).
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges Report 2009 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 4-10)
Visual Identities : Australianness in Australian Picture Books Pam Macintyre , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 352-368)
‘The literature written for young people can be a vehicle for mediating change in mainstream attitudes, or it can confirm existing values. As with all literature, it carries ideologies. In this chapter, I will focus on the picture book, which constructs its meanings through dual visual and written texts. In particular, I will analyse selected, recent award-winning Australian picture books for their representations of ‘Australianness’.’ (From author’s introduction, p. 352)
y separately published work icon Playing with Picturebooks : Postmodernism and the Postmodernesque Cherie Allan , Houndmills : Palgrave Macmillan , 2012 Z1909588 2012 single work criticism "Postmodernism has played a significant part in the development of playful and experimental picturebooks for children over the past 50 years. Playing with Picturebooks offers fresh insights into the continuing influence of postmodernism on picturebooks for children, covering a wide range of international picturebooks predominantly from the 1980s to the present. It represents a significant contribution to current debates centred on the decline of the effects of postmodernism on fiction and detects a shift from the postmodern to the postmodernesque. Playing with Picturebooks draws on a wide range of critical perspectives in examining postmodern approaches to narrative and illustration. Chapters discuss how metafictive devices enable different modes of representation, offer different perspectives to authorised version of history, and promote difference and ex-centricity over unity. Playing with Picturebooks is essential reading, not only for academics in the field of children's literature, but also for researchers, teachers and students." (Back cover)
Last amended 29 Jan 2019 15:28:55
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