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Issue Details: First known date: 2008... 2008 Incandescence
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A million years from now, the galaxy is divided between the vast, cooperative meta-civilisation known as the Amalgam, and the silent occupiers of the galactic core known as the Aloof. The Aloof have long rejected all attempts by the Amalgam to enter their territory, but have occasionally permitted travellers to take a perilous ride as unencrypted data in their communications network, providing a short-cut across the galaxy's central bulge. When Rakesh encounters a traveller, Lahl, who claims she was woken by the Aloof on such a journey and shown a meteor full of traces of DNA, he accepts her challenge to try to find the uncharted world deep in the Aloof's territory from which the meteor originated.

'Roi and Zak live inside the Splinter, a world of rock that swims in a sea of light they call the Incandescence. Living on the margins of a rigidly organised society, they seek to decipher the subtle clues that might reveal the true nature of the Splinter. In fact, the Splinter is orbiting a black hole, which is about to capture a neighbouring star, wreaking havoc. As the signs of danger grow, Roi, Zak, and a growing band of recruits struggle to understand and take control of their fate. Meanwhile, Rakesh is gradually uncovering their remote history, and his search for the lost DNA world ultimately leads him to a civilisation trapped in cultural stagnation, and startling revelations about the true nature and motives of the Aloof.' (Publisher's blurb)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Gollancz ,
      2008 .
      Description: 300
      Note/s:
      • Incldes an Afterword (p.299-300).
      ISBN: 9780575081628 (hbk.), 9780575081635 (pbk.)
    • San Francisco, California,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Night Shade Books ,
      2008 .
      Extent: 250p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes Bibliography (p.249-250).
      ISBN: 9781597801287 (hbk.)

Works about this Work

Geopolitics in Greg Egan's Science Fiction Darren Jorgensen , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 1 2014; (p. 186-198)
Title 'We'll All Change Together': Mathematics as Metaphor in Greg Egan's Fiction Neil Easterbrook , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mathematics in Popular Culture: Essays on Appearances in Film, Fiction, Games, Television and Other Media 2012; (p. 265-273)
The Fiction of the Future : Australian Science Fiction Russell Blackford , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 128-140)
'According to Russell Blackford 'commercial science fiction is the most international of literary forms.' He observes that 'Australian SF continues to flourish, even if it trails heroic fantasy in mass-market appeal.' Australian SF writers although published internationally, with a dedicated fan followings in USA, UK and Europe, were overlooked for a very long time by Australian multinational publishers. The international editions had to be imported and were then distributed in Australia (Congreve and Marquardt 8). Blackford in his chapter throws light on the history of Australian SF and observes how Australian SF writers, with their concern for the future, achieved a powerful synthesis in form and content. The progress of Australian SF, maturity of style in the work of younger writers, and massive worldwide sales make Blackford optimistic as he asserts that 'the best Australian writers in the genre will be prominent players on the world stage.' (Editor's foreword xii-xiii)
The Field : Reviews Colin Steele , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction , June no. 81 2011; (p. 22-23)

— Review of Zendegi Greg Egan , 2010 single work novel ; Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel
Untitled Keith Stevenson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 42 2009; (p. 134-137)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel ; Quarantine Greg Egan , 1992 single work novel
Cover Notes Lucy Sussex , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 27 July 2008; (p. 27)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel
Take Three Colin Steele , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Sunday Canberra Times , 7 September 2008; (p. 26)

— Review of The Daughters of Moab Kim Westwood , 2008 single work novel ; Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel
Untitled Scott Moore , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 20 September 2008; (p. 12)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel
When Insects Meet Humans, It All Adds Up Van Ikin , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29-30 November 2008; (p. 39)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel
Incandescence and the Digital People Alice Gorman , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 309 2009; (p. 45)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan , 2008 single work novel
An Interview with Greg Egan Russell Blackford (interviewer), 2009 single work interview
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 42 2009; (p. 16-23)
An Interview with Greg Egan Simon Petrie (interviewer), 2008 single work interview
— Appears in: Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine , no. 36 2008; (p. 85-88)
The Fiction of the Future : Australian Science Fiction Russell Blackford , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 128-140)
'According to Russell Blackford 'commercial science fiction is the most international of literary forms.' He observes that 'Australian SF continues to flourish, even if it trails heroic fantasy in mass-market appeal.' Australian SF writers although published internationally, with a dedicated fan followings in USA, UK and Europe, were overlooked for a very long time by Australian multinational publishers. The international editions had to be imported and were then distributed in Australia (Congreve and Marquardt 8). Blackford in his chapter throws light on the history of Australian SF and observes how Australian SF writers, with their concern for the future, achieved a powerful synthesis in form and content. The progress of Australian SF, maturity of style in the work of younger writers, and massive worldwide sales make Blackford optimistic as he asserts that 'the best Australian writers in the genre will be prominent players on the world stage.' (Editor's foreword xii-xiii)
Title 'We'll All Change Together': Mathematics as Metaphor in Greg Egan's Fiction Neil Easterbrook , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mathematics in Popular Culture: Essays on Appearances in Film, Fiction, Games, Television and Other Media 2012; (p. 265-273)
Geopolitics in Greg Egan's Science Fiction Darren Jorgensen , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 1 2014; (p. 186-198)
Last amended 18 Jan 2010 15:53:02
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