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Issue Details: First known date: 1989... 1989 The Lost Children : Thirteen Australians Taken from Their Aboriginal Families Tell of the Struggle to Find Their Natural Parents
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Thirteen Aboriginal authors tell of the struggle to find their natural parents. The book is divided into three sections: Growing Up; Homecomings; and Reflections. The oral histories are transcriptions of taped interviews with the contributors. The contributors describe their childhood memories and experiences of the lies, deceit and suffering under government policies. Their stories are first hand accounts of their removal and placement into institutions and white foster families, and the difficulties they encountered along the way. Some children were sent to church institutions that 'wanted to created an Aboriginal working class', while others were sent to foster families. All of the children in these stories suffered the trauma of separation and many children were treated harshly and were subject to abuse. In being removed, they lost their links to family and community, and were forced to forge new identities. In their agonising search to find their real families they are confronted with a variety of confusing issues such as lack of identity, government and bureaucratic red tape, loss of family members, and the breakdown of family ties and culture.

Notes

  • In Australia today there may be 100,000 people of Aboriginal descent who do not know their families or communities. Through compelling first-hand accounts, this book describes the agonising search for families and the struggle to recapture Aboriginality.
  • Dedication: This book is dedicated to all our Old People who never saw their children again and to all our children who never came home.
  • Epigraph: To become a person complete; / A woman becoming whole. / Black and Beautiful, for the first time I listen / To the yearning of my soul. -- Pauline McLeod.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording, braille.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Doubleday , 1989 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction : The Lost Children : Thirteen Australians Taken from Their Aboriginal Families Tell of the Struggle to Find Their Natural Parents, Oomera Edwards , 1989 anthology criticism oral history (p. ix-xxv)
Never Morei"Separated", Pauline E. McLeod , 1989 single work poetry (p. 22-23)
Sitting on a Fencei"What's ya name sister?", Sharon Carpenter , 1989 single work poetry (p. 29)
A Life Timei"I think I am gonna die", Pauline E. McLeod , 1989 single work poetry (p. 104-105)
The Fortunate Onei"Hey you!", Pauline E. McLeod , 1989 single work poetry (p. 172)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Lives in Custody Tim Rowse , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: After Mabo : Interpreting Indigenous Traditions 1993; (p. 27-53)
Lives in Custody Tim Rowse , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: After Mabo : Interpreting Indigenous Traditions 1993; (p. 27-53)

Awards

Last amended 25 Mar 2010 12:30:12
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