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Issue Details: First known date: 1984... 1984 No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: McPhee Gribble , 1984 .
      Extent: 284p.
      Description: illus., facsim., ports.
      ISBN: 014007340X, 0869140760

Works about this Work

Of Intemperance, Class and Gender in Colonial Queensland : A Working-Class Woman's Account of Alcohol Abuse Howard Le Couteur , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 8 no. 3 2011; (p. 139-157)
'Writings by working-class women are relatively rare in the historical record, especially for mid-nineteenth century Australia. The letters of Julia Cross to her mother in Ely, Cambridgeshire, are notable not just for the mundane matters they discuss, but for the unique insight they give to a woman trapped by her class and gender because of her husband's intemperate habits. In a hard-headed decision, Julia resolved to stay with her husband and live out the consequences. The letters graphically describe her struggle to provide the necessities of life for her family and the stresses of physically protecting her children when her husband was drunk. Julia is revealed as a hard-working and resourceful woman who was committed to giving her children the best she could. The letters give us access to one working-class woman's perspective on men's drinking, one that was certainly not the narrow vision of the domestic sphere associated with the middle class. Julia found spaces outside the domestic sphere in which to work for her family's benefit.' (Author's abstract)
Reading 'Walkabout' in the 1930s Mitchell Rolls , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'The Australian magazine Walkabout, loosely modelled on National Geographic, was published between 1934 and 1974, with a concluding single edition being issued in January 1978. Unlike National Geographic, the very middlebrow Walkabout has attracted little critical scrutiny. The few responses to Walkabout have predominantly criticised its role in fomenting a specific version of the settlement myth, in particular that of promoting white progress and modernisation of the outback against a projected Aboriginal absence. Leaving aside its representation of Aborigines (this matter is dealt with in a forthcoming essay) this paper argues that at least in the first decade of Walkabout's long run, its warmth for and promotion of Australia, particularly the interior and remote regions, is distinctive when contrasted with the nationalist fervour of other contemporary movements, and that ideologically-bound criticism overlooks the more nuanced forms of settler belonging the magazine facilitated.' (Author's abstract)
Australian Literature and the Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation Robert Dixon , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 115-126)

'Robert Dixon focuses on the present as a key moment of transformation in Australian literary and cultural as it moves from its founding 'nationalist' moment into a transnational framing of key issues.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)

No Place for a Nervous Lady Duncan Richardson , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , July vol. 19 no. 3 2000; (p. 70)

— Review of No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence
Untitled Donna Lee Brien , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , vol. 11 no. 2 1999; (p. 116-119)

— Review of No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence
Untitled Carol Bolton , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Centre Broadsheet , November - December vol. 3 no. 6 1984; (p. 4)

— Review of No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence
Paperbacks Lucy Sussex , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 6 March 1999; (p. 8)

— Review of Underground Mudrooroo , 1999 single work novel ; No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence
Defiant Pioneers Fiona Capp , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 18 February 1995; (p. 8)

— Review of No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence ; Dorothy Hewett : Selected Critical Essays 1995 anthology criticism biography bibliography ; Our Own Matilda : Matilda Jane Evans 1827-1886 : Pioneer Woman and Novelist Barbara Wall , 1994 single work criticism biography
They Tried to Remake England in the Bush Eva Cox , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 May 1984; (p. 42)

— Review of No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence
Victim and Observer Penelope Nelson , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 22-23 April 1989; (p. 12)

— Review of No Place for a Nervous Lady : Voices from the Australian Bush 1984 anthology correspondence
Australian Literature and the Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation Robert Dixon , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 115-126)

'Robert Dixon focuses on the present as a key moment of transformation in Australian literary and cultural as it moves from its founding 'nationalist' moment into a transnational framing of key issues.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)

Reading 'Walkabout' in the 1930s Mitchell Rolls , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'The Australian magazine Walkabout, loosely modelled on National Geographic, was published between 1934 and 1974, with a concluding single edition being issued in January 1978. Unlike National Geographic, the very middlebrow Walkabout has attracted little critical scrutiny. The few responses to Walkabout have predominantly criticised its role in fomenting a specific version of the settlement myth, in particular that of promoting white progress and modernisation of the outback against a projected Aboriginal absence. Leaving aside its representation of Aborigines (this matter is dealt with in a forthcoming essay) this paper argues that at least in the first decade of Walkabout's long run, its warmth for and promotion of Australia, particularly the interior and remote regions, is distinctive when contrasted with the nationalist fervour of other contemporary movements, and that ideologically-bound criticism overlooks the more nuanced forms of settler belonging the magazine facilitated.' (Author's abstract)
Of Intemperance, Class and Gender in Colonial Queensland : A Working-Class Woman's Account of Alcohol Abuse Howard Le Couteur , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 8 no. 3 2011; (p. 139-157)
'Writings by working-class women are relatively rare in the historical record, especially for mid-nineteenth century Australia. The letters of Julia Cross to her mother in Ely, Cambridgeshire, are notable not just for the mundane matters they discuss, but for the unique insight they give to a woman trapped by her class and gender because of her husband's intemperate habits. In a hard-headed decision, Julia resolved to stay with her husband and live out the consequences. The letters graphically describe her struggle to provide the necessities of life for her family and the stresses of physically protecting her children when her husband was drunk. Julia is revealed as a hard-working and resourceful woman who was committed to giving her children the best she could. The letters give us access to one working-class woman's perspective on men's drinking, one that was certainly not the narrow vision of the domestic sphere associated with the middle class. Julia found spaces outside the domestic sphere in which to work for her family's benefit.' (Author's abstract)
y separately published work icon Gender and Landscape: Australian Colonial Women Writers Delys Bird , London : Menzies Centre for Australian Studies , 1989 Z350615 1989 single work criticism
Last amended 14 Jan 2009 14:04:54
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