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Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 Australian Literature : Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Literary Transculturations and Modernity : Some Reflections Anne Holden Rønning , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'In an increasingly global world literary and cultural critics are constantly searching for ways in which to analyse and debate texts and artefacts. Postcolonial theories and studies have provided useful tools for analyzing, among others, New Literatures in English and other languages, as well as throwing new light on an understanding of older texts. But today, with the increase in diaspora studies in literature and cultural studies, new ways of looking at texts are paramount, given the complexity of contemporary literature. There is, as Bill Ashcroft writes, a 'strange contrapuntal relationship between identity, history, and nation that needs to be unravelled.' With references to Australian literature, this article will present some reflections on transculturation and modernities, the themes of the Nordic Network of Transcultural Literary Studies, which considers transculturation not as a theory but, 'a matrix through which a set of critical tools and vocabularies can be refined for the study of texts from a localized world, but institutionalised globally' and where , ' the engagement of multiple sites and their routes with the progression of "one modernity" in some way or other inform the aesthetics of transcultural literature.' (Author's introduction)
Impossible Literary Histories Nicole Moore , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 25 no. 3 2010; (p. 49-60)
'The extent to which a notional Australia is at stake in new ventures in Australian literary history is ... a timely and productive question. These three new titles present quite varied versions of both literary history and any proffered "Australia", reflecting at once the current state of the field and the impulses galvanising literary endeavour in different quarters' (p.50-51).
The Unbearable (Im)Possibility of Belonging : Andrew McGahan’s The White Earth Martina Horakova , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 109-128)
This chapter explores ‘the ‘postcolonial uncertainty’ of settler belonging from the purely outsider’s perspective of someone who does not live in Australia but is nevertheless intrigued by the apparently disturbing dilemma of non-Indigenous Australians attempting to articulate a fulfilling relationship to their land.’ (p 110)
Non-Fiction 2007-2008 Ronald Blaber , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 53 no. 2008; (p. 76-92)

— Review of The Rise and Rise of Kerry Packer Paul Barry , 1993 single work biography ; This Crazy Thing a Life : Australian Jewish Autobiography Richard Freadman , 2007 selected work criticism ; John Winston Howard Peter Van Onselen , Wayne Errington , 2007 single work biography ; Mudrooroo : A Likely Story : Identity and Belonging in Postcolonial Australia Maureen Clark , 2007 single work criticism ; A Matter of Conscience : Sir Ronald Wilson Antonio Buti , 2007 single work biography ; Contrary Rhetoric : Lectures on Landscape and Language John Kinsella , 2008 selected work criticism essay ; Australian Literature : Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism Graham Huggan , 2007 single work criticism ; Power Plays : Australian Theatre and the Public Agenda Hilary Glow , 2007 single work criticism ; Heartsick for Country : Stories of Love, Spirit and Creation 2008 anthology life story ; Conversations With The Mob 2008 anthology life story ; Make It Australian: The Australian Performing Group, the Pram Factory and New Wave Theatre Gabrielle Wolf , 2008 single work criticism ; Stressing the Modern : Cultural Politics in Australian Women's Poetry Ann Vickery , 2007 selected work criticism
Untitled Gillian Whitlock , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 193-197)

— Review of Australian Literature : Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism Graham Huggan , 2007 single work criticism
Untitled Robert Dixon , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Ariel , April - July vol. 40 no. 2-3 2009; (p. 275-278)

— Review of Australian Literature : Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism Graham Huggan , 2007 single work criticism
Edith & Helen : Reading Nation in the 1990s Eleni Pavlides , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 14-23)
'Nations are sustained by nationalism, which is built on the narratives that are retold in official histories, national literatures, media representations, invented traditions and foundational myths. In the past fifteen years or so, Australian literature and Australia's history of nation formation have found themselves between a rock and hard place. Both have been (and still are) threatened and destabilised by, amongst other things, the forces of globalisation...' (p. 14)
The Unbearable (Im)Possibility of Belonging : Andrew McGahan’s The White Earth Martina Horakova , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 109-128)
This chapter explores ‘the ‘postcolonial uncertainty’ of settler belonging from the purely outsider’s perspective of someone who does not live in Australia but is nevertheless intrigued by the apparently disturbing dilemma of non-Indigenous Australians attempting to articulate a fulfilling relationship to their land.’ (p 110)
Impossible Literary Histories Nicole Moore , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 25 no. 3 2010; (p. 49-60)
'The extent to which a notional Australia is at stake in new ventures in Australian literary history is ... a timely and productive question. These three new titles present quite varied versions of both literary history and any proffered "Australia", reflecting at once the current state of the field and the impulses galvanising literary endeavour in different quarters' (p.50-51).
Literary Transculturations and Modernity : Some Reflections Anne Holden Rønning , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'In an increasingly global world literary and cultural critics are constantly searching for ways in which to analyse and debate texts and artefacts. Postcolonial theories and studies have provided useful tools for analyzing, among others, New Literatures in English and other languages, as well as throwing new light on an understanding of older texts. But today, with the increase in diaspora studies in literature and cultural studies, new ways of looking at texts are paramount, given the complexity of contemporary literature. There is, as Bill Ashcroft writes, a 'strange contrapuntal relationship between identity, history, and nation that needs to be unravelled.' With references to Australian literature, this article will present some reflections on transculturation and modernities, the themes of the Nordic Network of Transcultural Literary Studies, which considers transculturation not as a theory but, 'a matrix through which a set of critical tools and vocabularies can be refined for the study of texts from a localized world, but institutionalised globally' and where , ' the engagement of multiple sites and their routes with the progression of "one modernity" in some way or other inform the aesthetics of transcultural literature.' (Author's introduction)
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Last amended 2 Jul 2008 08:00:55
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