AustLit logo
  • Author:agent James McAuley http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/mcauley-james
Issue Details: First known date: 1959... 1959 The End of Modernity : Essays on Literature, Art and Culture
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Latest Issues

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1959 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Sacred Art in the Modern World, James McAuley , single work
Reflections on Poetry, James McAuley , single work criticism
Asia's Development and Human Values, James McAuley , single work

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

"By No Stretch . . .a Locus Amoenus"— Traces of Dirt in the Early Poetry of James McAuley Jean Page , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 20 no. 1 2020;

'Western mythology traditionally offered sparse, negative readings of things related to earth, as a prison-like entity guarded by the god Hades (Cirlot, Grillet). This paper traces motifs of dirt and soil in several early poems by James McAuley (1917-76). “Envoi” (1938), an inland landscape from McAuley’s stay in Bungendore, rural NSW, attributes to the “soil, the season and the shifting airs” the “faint sterility that disheartens and derides.” Similarly, “The Tomb of Heracles” (1947-49) reiterates motifs of aridity and sterility in imagery of dry landscape: “Blind light, dry rock, a tree that does not bear.” Nonetheless, a differentiation occurs in “Envoi,” in introducing the motif of suppressed fertility and “good chance” in the “artesian heart,” in which earth is reluctantly recognised as the eventual, vital water bearer.

'This paper traces the important formative influence of T.S. Eliot, notably “The Waste Land” and Australia’s own agency of modernism the Jindyworobak movement, with its original environmental manifesto (1937) and celebration of Australia’s dry interiors and indigenous values. It traces other, desolate encounters with earth in McAuley’s war-time reading of early Portuguese chronicles of voyage reflected in his explorer poem “Henry the Navigator” (1944)— “These roots of stunted bushes scrabble earth/Like withered birds […].” The poem adverts to later European “discovery” of Australia’s reportedly arid coasts. 

'The paper also identifies the return to a more accepting reading of motifs of dry earth-scapes “Harsh, dry, abrasive, spikey, rough” in  McAuley’s later poems depicting the Coles Bay nature reserve in eastern Tasmania: “By no stretch [..] a locus amoenus” (Bush Scene”, 1974).'  (Publication abstract)

How to Gossip with Angels : Australian Poetry After the Gods Noel Rowe , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 19 no. 2 2005; (p. 177-183)
Examines the relationship between religion and Australian poetry.
James McAuley's New Guinea : Colonialism, Modernity and Suburbia Robert Dixon , 1998 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 18 no. 4 1998; (p. 20-40) Prosthetic Gods : Travel, Representation and Colonial Governance 2001; (p. 149-175)
y separately published work icon James McAuley Lyn McCredden , South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1992 Z90326 1992 single work criticism
Mastering Romanticism : The Struggle for Vocation in the Texts of James McAuley Lyn McCredden , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imagining Romanticism : Essays on English and Australian Romanticisms 1992; (p. 265-273)
Blood and Darkness G. K. W. Johnson , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: The Observer , 25 July vol. 2 no. 15 1959;

— Review of The End of Modernity : Essays on Literature, Art and Culture James McAuley , 1959 selected work criticism
James McCauleys Latest Book : End of Modernity Martin Haley , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: Advocate: A Weekly Catholic Journal , 23 July 1959; (p. 11)

— Review of The End of Modernity : Essays on Literature, Art and Culture James McAuley , 1959 selected work criticism
McCauley on Modernity Douglas Stewart , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 17 June vol. 80 no. 4140 1959; (p. 2,58)

— Review of The End of Modernity : Essays on Literature, Art and Culture James McAuley , 1959 selected work criticism
The Wrong End of Modernity Robert Hughes , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Letters , December vol. 2 no. 3 1959; (p. 45-47)

— Review of The End of Modernity : Essays on Literature, Art and Culture James McAuley , 1959 selected work criticism
"Argues with McAuley's approach to plastic arts ... questioning what is seen as an attack on present-day painting and sculpture through McAuley's insistence that these arts are designed soley for sensual pleasure, not for use or meaning as was the function of traditional art." (Robert Ross, Australian Literary Criticism, 1945-1988, p. 252.)
Untitled Barbara Allen , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Quarterly , vol. 31 no. 4 1959; (p. 111-114)

— Review of The End of Modernity : Essays on Literature, Art and Culture James McAuley , 1959 selected work criticism
How to Gossip with Angels : Australian Poetry After the Gods Noel Rowe , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 19 no. 2 2005; (p. 177-183)
Examines the relationship between religion and Australian poetry.
y separately published work icon James McAuley Lyn McCredden , South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1992 Z90326 1992 single work criticism
Mastering Romanticism : The Struggle for Vocation in the Texts of James McAuley Lyn McCredden , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imagining Romanticism : Essays on English and Australian Romanticisms 1992; (p. 265-273)
James McAuley's New Guinea : Colonialism, Modernity and Suburbia Robert Dixon , 1998 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 18 no. 4 1998; (p. 20-40) Prosthetic Gods : Travel, Representation and Colonial Governance 2001; (p. 149-175)
"By No Stretch . . .a Locus Amoenus"— Traces of Dirt in the Early Poetry of James McAuley Jean Page , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 20 no. 1 2020;

'Western mythology traditionally offered sparse, negative readings of things related to earth, as a prison-like entity guarded by the god Hades (Cirlot, Grillet). This paper traces motifs of dirt and soil in several early poems by James McAuley (1917-76). “Envoi” (1938), an inland landscape from McAuley’s stay in Bungendore, rural NSW, attributes to the “soil, the season and the shifting airs” the “faint sterility that disheartens and derides.” Similarly, “The Tomb of Heracles” (1947-49) reiterates motifs of aridity and sterility in imagery of dry landscape: “Blind light, dry rock, a tree that does not bear.” Nonetheless, a differentiation occurs in “Envoi,” in introducing the motif of suppressed fertility and “good chance” in the “artesian heart,” in which earth is reluctantly recognised as the eventual, vital water bearer.

'This paper traces the important formative influence of T.S. Eliot, notably “The Waste Land” and Australia’s own agency of modernism the Jindyworobak movement, with its original environmental manifesto (1937) and celebration of Australia’s dry interiors and indigenous values. It traces other, desolate encounters with earth in McAuley’s war-time reading of early Portuguese chronicles of voyage reflected in his explorer poem “Henry the Navigator” (1944)— “These roots of stunted bushes scrabble earth/Like withered birds […].” The poem adverts to later European “discovery” of Australia’s reportedly arid coasts. 

'The paper also identifies the return to a more accepting reading of motifs of dry earth-scapes “Harsh, dry, abrasive, spikey, rough” in  McAuley’s later poems depicting the Coles Bay nature reserve in eastern Tasmania: “By no stretch [..] a locus amoenus” (Bush Scene”, 1974).'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 23 Nov 2018 13:26:40
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X