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Issue Details: First known date: 1913... 1913 The Waiter Speaks
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1913
      .
      (Manuscript) assertion
      Note/s:
      • Held in the Berkelouws Collection (item 38), Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales.

      Holdings

      Held at: Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW

Works about this Work

‘The Waiter Speaks’ : Stella Miles Franklin and the Chicago Garment Workers' Strike, 1910–1911 Janet Lee , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women's Studies International Forum , July-August vol. 34 no. 4 2011; (p. 290-301)
'This paper focuses on Australian feminist novelist Stella Miles Franklin's unpublished one-act play 'The Waiter Speaks', previously unremarked by Franklin scholars. Written during Franklin's work as secretary for the National Women's Trade Union League, the play addresses the 1910-1911 Chicago garment workers' strike, a massive conflict that shaped union history through its precedent for arbitration and a female leadership that crossed class and ethnic lines. Franklin was in charge of League publicity for the strike and provided commentary on the conflict through the League's journal Life and Labor. Such experiences provided narrative authority for her protest play that sought to educate and provide a 'call to arms'. The paper contributes to U.S. women's history and Australian literary studies by giving voice to this long-forgotten play of a notable feminist author, contextualising it in labour history and in the literary traditions that shaped Franklin's writing during this period.' (Editor's abstract)
Miles Franklin's Dramatic Ambitions, or, Why Stella Really Came Home Susan Bradley Smith , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 21 no. 1 2007; (p. 16-21)
Susan Bradley Smith examines the reasons behind Miles Franklin's '"failure" to achieve success [as a playwright] and its impact upon her life'. Bradley Smith concludes: 'If Franklin's "silence" as a playwright tells us anything, it is that all definition, like identity, is a negotiation. Perhaps it also serves as a reminder that the way in which history and memory are controlled and manipulated ... should be scrutinized more critically, if only to acknowledge the awkward constellations that define Australian identity.'
Miles Franklin's Dramatic Ambitions, or, Why Stella Really Came Home Susan Bradley Smith , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 21 no. 1 2007; (p. 16-21)
Susan Bradley Smith examines the reasons behind Miles Franklin's '"failure" to achieve success [as a playwright] and its impact upon her life'. Bradley Smith concludes: 'If Franklin's "silence" as a playwright tells us anything, it is that all definition, like identity, is a negotiation. Perhaps it also serves as a reminder that the way in which history and memory are controlled and manipulated ... should be scrutinized more critically, if only to acknowledge the awkward constellations that define Australian identity.'
‘The Waiter Speaks’ : Stella Miles Franklin and the Chicago Garment Workers' Strike, 1910–1911 Janet Lee , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women's Studies International Forum , July-August vol. 34 no. 4 2011; (p. 290-301)
'This paper focuses on Australian feminist novelist Stella Miles Franklin's unpublished one-act play 'The Waiter Speaks', previously unremarked by Franklin scholars. Written during Franklin's work as secretary for the National Women's Trade Union League, the play addresses the 1910-1911 Chicago garment workers' strike, a massive conflict that shaped union history through its precedent for arbitration and a female leadership that crossed class and ethnic lines. Franklin was in charge of League publicity for the strike and provided commentary on the conflict through the League's journal Life and Labor. Such experiences provided narrative authority for her protest play that sought to educate and provide a 'call to arms'. The paper contributes to U.S. women's history and Australian literary studies by giving voice to this long-forgotten play of a notable feminist author, contextualising it in labour history and in the literary traditions that shaped Franklin's writing during this period.' (Editor's abstract)
Last amended 8 Aug 2007 17:10:52
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