y Black Tide single work   novel   crime  
Is part of Jack Irish Peter Temple 1996 series - author novel (number 2 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1999... 1999 Black Tide
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Adaptations

form y Jack Irish : Black Tide Andrew Knight , Matt Cameron , Australia : Essential Media and Entertainment ABC Television , 2012 Z1798564 2012 single work film/TV crime

Jack helps an old family friend whose son has gone missing. As Jack begins to dig, he discovers the missing man has something to hide, and his friends are people with deadly secrets.

Source: David Knox, 'All-Star Cast Joins Jack Irish Telemovies'. 21 October 2011 (http://www.tvtonight.com.au/). (Sighted 06/01/2012)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Anita, Nicholas, and Louise: the Charity, the Hope, and the Faith
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Zwart tij
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      De Boekerij ,
      2003 .
      Extent: 316p.
      ISBN: 9022534642

Works about this Work

The Representation of Aboriginality in the Novels of Peter Temple Bill Phillips , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 20 2016; (p. 9-21)
'Identity politics is fraught with difficulties. Of few places is this truer than in Australia when it comes to the representation of Aboriginality. On the one hand the absence or invisibility of Aboriginality in Australian life and culture maybe interpreted as a deliberate exclusion of a people whose presence is uncomfortable or inconvenient for many Australians of immigrant origin. Equally, the representation of Aboriginality by non-Aboriginals may be seen as an appropriation of identity, an inexcusable commercial exploitation or an act of neocolonialism. Best-selling and prize-winning South African-born author Peter Temple appears to be very much aware of these pitfalls. In his crime novels, written between 1996 and 2009, he has obviously made the decision to grasp the nettle and attempt to represent Aboriginality in a way that would be as acceptable as possible. This paper traces the evolution of Temple's representation of Aboriginality through the three major Aboriginal characters present in his novels: Cameron Delray (Bad Debts, 1996; Black Tide, 1999; Dead Point, 2000; and White Dog, 2003), Ned Lowey (An Iron Rose, 1998) and Detective Sergeant Paul Dove (The Broken Shore, 2005 and Truth, 2009).' (Publication abstract)
Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
Untitled Rebecca Johinke , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , July no. 25 2004;

— Review of Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel
When Crime Does Pay Rod Moran , 2004 single work interview
— Appears in: The West Australian , 21 February 2004; (p. 7)
CoverNotes Michelle Griffin , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 5 March 2000; (p. 11)

— Review of Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel
Untitled Rebecca Johinke , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , July no. 25 2004;

— Review of Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel
Blood, Gore, Intrigue: It's a Healthy Scene Stuart Coupe , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 March 1999; (p. 9)

— Review of The Black Prince : A Cliff Hardy Novel Peter Corris 1998 single work novel ; Five Ring Circus Jon Cleary 1998 single work novel ; Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel ; Murder in the Groove Dave Warner 1998 single work novel ; Heads You Die, Tails They Kill You James Tatham 1998 single work novel
Where the Big Boys Don't Take Prisoners Graeme Blundell , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 29-30 May 1999; (p. 14)

— Review of Cat Catcher Caroline Shaw 1999 single work novel ; Lightning Mine Philip McLaren 1999 single work novel ; Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel
Crime Where Credit is Due Stuart Coupe , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 10 April 1999; (p. 7)

— Review of The Dragon Man Garry Disher 1999 single work novel ; Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel
Peninsula Deaths J. R. Carroll , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 210 1999; (p. 44)

— Review of The Dragon Man Garry Disher 1999 single work novel ; Black Tide Peter Temple 1999 single work novel
When Crime Does Pay Rod Moran , 2004 single work interview
— Appears in: The West Australian , 21 February 2004; (p. 7)
Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
The Representation of Aboriginality in the Novels of Peter Temple Bill Phillips , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 20 2016; (p. 9-21)
'Identity politics is fraught with difficulties. Of few places is this truer than in Australia when it comes to the representation of Aboriginality. On the one hand the absence or invisibility of Aboriginality in Australian life and culture maybe interpreted as a deliberate exclusion of a people whose presence is uncomfortable or inconvenient for many Australians of immigrant origin. Equally, the representation of Aboriginality by non-Aboriginals may be seen as an appropriation of identity, an inexcusable commercial exploitation or an act of neocolonialism. Best-selling and prize-winning South African-born author Peter Temple appears to be very much aware of these pitfalls. In his crime novels, written between 1996 and 2009, he has obviously made the decision to grasp the nettle and attempt to represent Aboriginality in a way that would be as acceptable as possible. This paper traces the evolution of Temple's representation of Aboriginality through the three major Aboriginal characters present in his novels: Cameron Delray (Bad Debts, 1996; Black Tide, 1999; Dead Point, 2000; and White Dog, 2003), Ned Lowey (An Iron Rose, 1998) and Detective Sergeant Paul Dove (The Broken Shore, 2005 and Truth, 2009).' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 3 Jun 2014 16:44:41
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