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image of person or book cover 6073545252128366902.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
Note: Lewis O'Brien's life story as told, through interviews, to Mary-Anne Gale.
Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 And the Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The story of Kaurna man Uncle Lewis O'Brien and his family, beginning with his great, great grandmother Kudnarto - the first Aboriginal woman to marry a white man in South Australia. When Lewis began his own journey in life, he found he was constantly out of sync with others - white on the outside but Aboriginal on the inside...' from back cover.

Notes

  • Dedication: To Auntie May and Uncle Lewis Adams, for their wisdom and generosity. For Aileen Gale, in admiration.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Kent Town, Norwood, Payneham & St Peters area, Adelaide - North / North East, Adelaide, South Australia,: Wakefield Press , 2007 .
      image of person or book cover 6073545252128366902.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 242p.
      Description: illus., port.
      ISBN: 9781762547308

Works about this Work

[Review Essay] And The Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien, as Told to Mary-Anne Gale Peter Gifford , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 2 2009; (p. 136-138)

— Review of And the Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien Lewis O'Brien , Mary-Anne Gale , 2007 single work biography

'‘It was a bright, cold day in April and the clocks were striking thirteen.’ This is not the first line of Kaurna elder Lewis O’Brien’s story, although it obviously could have been, given his book’s title. Instead, it is the opening sentence of George Orwell’s 1984, a novel concerned with the struggle of the human spirit against totalitarianism. There are some similarities between Orwell’s book and O’Brien’s account of his life and times; it is not drawing too long a bow to claim, for example, that Orwell’s Big Brother and so-called Chief Protectors of Australia’s Aborigines had things in common in terms of power and its misuse, at least as far as Aboriginal people were concerned, when O’Brien was growing up in South Australia.' (Introduction)

Pick of the Week Bruce Elder , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 2-3 June 2007; (p. 35)

— Review of And the Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien Lewis O'Brien , Mary-Anne Gale , 2007 single work biography
Pick of the Week Bruce Elder , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 2-3 June 2007; (p. 35)

— Review of And the Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien Lewis O'Brien , Mary-Anne Gale , 2007 single work biography
[Review Essay] And The Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien, as Told to Mary-Anne Gale Peter Gifford , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 2 2009; (p. 136-138)

— Review of And the Clock Struck Thirteen : The Life and Thoughts of Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien Lewis O'Brien , Mary-Anne Gale , 2007 single work biography

'‘It was a bright, cold day in April and the clocks were striking thirteen.’ This is not the first line of Kaurna elder Lewis O’Brien’s story, although it obviously could have been, given his book’s title. Instead, it is the opening sentence of George Orwell’s 1984, a novel concerned with the struggle of the human spirit against totalitarianism. There are some similarities between Orwell’s book and O’Brien’s account of his life and times; it is not drawing too long a bow to claim, for example, that Orwell’s Big Brother and so-called Chief Protectors of Australia’s Aborigines had things in common in terms of power and its misuse, at least as far as Aboriginal people were concerned, when O’Brien was growing up in South Australia.' (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Jul 2016 08:31:20
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