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y separately published work icon All My Mob selected work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 All My Mob
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This ... collection of stories features a foreword by Dr Pam Johnston that places Ruby’s anecdotes in the context of a country which seems incapable of healing its past or of creating a better future for Indigenous people. Featuring the best stories from Ruby’s Real Deadly, plus many unpublished gems dating as far back as 1992, All My Mob’s portrayal of family life, ‘home’, and life as an Aborigine in today’s Australia is fascinating, often confronting and unforgettable.' (Source: UQP website: www.uqp.uq.edu.au)

Notes

  • Includes some stories from Real Deadly.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Dancing with the Prime Minister Jennifer Jones , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 3 no. 1 2012; (p. 101-113)
'When Ruby Langford Ginibi and her daughter Pearl prepared for the Foundation for Aboriginal Affairs Debutante Ball in 1968, they contributed to development of a significant new expression of Aboriginal identity and community belonging. Debutante balls were traditionally staged as a rite of passage that introduced a select group of young ladies to British high society. They went into decline in the UK in the late 1950s, under pressure from anti-establishment and sexual revolutions. The tradition remained popular in Australia, as the debutante ball had developed important status as fundraising events for local organisations. This article examines the history of Aboriginal girls 'coming out' at a debutante ball. While the inclusion of Aboriginal girls in debutante balls was encouraged as a means to achieve assimilation, proud celebration at all-Aboriginal events provoked controversy. Ruby Langford Ginibi's reflection upon her daughter's dance with the Australian Prime Minister at the 1968 Foundation for Aboriginal Affairs Debutante Ball is instructive. It explains how an exclusive, sexist British ritual has been transformed into a vital, inclusive Aboriginal rite of passage and challenges non-Aboriginal readers to re-evaluate their assessment of the tradition.' (Author's abstract)
Ruby Langford Ginibi´s Influence on a Spanish Student of Australian Studies Caty Ribas , 2012 single work prose
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 3 no. 1 2012; (p. 60-66)
'Dr Ruby Langford Ginibi influenced me, personally and academically speaking, with her text Haunted by the Past, her direct style of writing and her personal approach to life and hardship. This text pays tribute to her by explaining how reading Haunted by the Past turned out to be a central text in my life.' (Author's abstract, 60)
Story Gathering Alexis Harley , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: M/C Reviews

— Review of All My Mob Ruby Langford Ginibi , 2007 selected work autobiography
Going Back to Bundjalung Country for all the Mob Amy McQuire , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 14 June vol. 6 no. 131 2007; (p. 13)
Books Non-Fiction Emma Rodgers , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 4 - 5 August 2007; (p. 24)

— Review of All My Mob Ruby Langford Ginibi , 2007 selected work autobiography
Untitled Fiona Stager , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , April/May vol. 86 no. 8 2007; (p. 38)

— Review of All My Mob Ruby Langford Ginibi , 2007 selected work autobiography
Memoir Anita Heiss , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 22 May vol. 125 no. 6570 2007; (p. 64-65)

— Review of All My Mob Ruby Langford Ginibi , 2007 selected work autobiography
Books Non-Fiction Emma Rodgers , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 4 - 5 August 2007; (p. 24)

— Review of All My Mob Ruby Langford Ginibi , 2007 selected work autobiography
Story Gathering Alexis Harley , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: M/C Reviews

— Review of All My Mob Ruby Langford Ginibi , 2007 selected work autobiography
Going Back to Bundjalung Country for all the Mob Amy McQuire , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 14 June vol. 6 no. 131 2007; (p. 13)
Ruby Langford Ginibi´s Influence on a Spanish Student of Australian Studies Caty Ribas , 2012 single work prose
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 3 no. 1 2012; (p. 60-66)
'Dr Ruby Langford Ginibi influenced me, personally and academically speaking, with her text Haunted by the Past, her direct style of writing and her personal approach to life and hardship. This text pays tribute to her by explaining how reading Haunted by the Past turned out to be a central text in my life.' (Author's abstract, 60)
Dancing with the Prime Minister Jennifer Jones , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 3 no. 1 2012; (p. 101-113)
'When Ruby Langford Ginibi and her daughter Pearl prepared for the Foundation for Aboriginal Affairs Debutante Ball in 1968, they contributed to development of a significant new expression of Aboriginal identity and community belonging. Debutante balls were traditionally staged as a rite of passage that introduced a select group of young ladies to British high society. They went into decline in the UK in the late 1950s, under pressure from anti-establishment and sexual revolutions. The tradition remained popular in Australia, as the debutante ball had developed important status as fundraising events for local organisations. This article examines the history of Aboriginal girls 'coming out' at a debutante ball. While the inclusion of Aboriginal girls in debutante balls was encouraged as a means to achieve assimilation, proud celebration at all-Aboriginal events provoked controversy. Ruby Langford Ginibi's reflection upon her daughter's dance with the Australian Prime Minister at the 1968 Foundation for Aboriginal Affairs Debutante Ball is instructive. It explains how an exclusive, sexist British ritual has been transformed into a vital, inclusive Aboriginal rite of passage and challenges non-Aboriginal readers to re-evaluate their assessment of the tradition.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 5 Jun 2013 10:48:00
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