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person or book cover
Courtesy of Penguin Books Australia.
y separately published work icon Ziba Came on a Boat single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2007... 2007 Ziba Came on a Boat
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A picture book about a little (Afghan) girl whose family has lost everything and their brave journey across the sea to make a new life.' (Source: QUT Library Catalogue)

Exhibitions

6980259
7957836
9563074

Notes

  • This is affiliated with Dr Laurel Cohn's Picture Book Diet because it contains representations of food and/or food practices.

    Food depiction
    • Incidental
    Food types
    • Everyday foods
    • Everyday drinks
    Food practices
    • Food preparation
    Gender
    • Food preparation - female [domestic]
    Signage n/a
    Positive/negative value n/a
    Food as sense of place n/a
    Setting n/a
    Food as social cohesion n/a
    Food as cultural identity
    • Non-Anglo characters
    • Refugee story
    Food as character identity n/a
    Food as language n/a

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it contains an Afghan character.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2007 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Penguin Books Australia.
      Extent: 1v. (unpaged)p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 9780670028610, 0670028614

Works about this Work

The Politics of Picture Books : Stories of Displaced Children in Twenty-first-century Australia Mary Tomsic , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 15 no. 2 2018; (p. 339-356)

'This article uses cultural representations to write refugee history. It examines twenty-first-century picture books about displaced children, alongside published responses to them, to explore how refugee experiences and histories are constructed, both for and about children, in an Australian context. The visual literary form of picture books as political texts is examined as a space for discussion and dialogue. Published responses to them, however, more commonly reveal rigid interpretations of imagined readers, invoking binary divisions between displaced and non-displaced children. Through these sources, questions of humanisation and (de)politicisations in refugee history are considered.'  (Publication abstract)

What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

A Similarity or Difference : The Problem of Race in Australian Picture Books Victoria Flanagan , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , April vol. 51 no. 2 2013; (p. 13-22)
'The prevailing humanist ideology in fiction produced for children entails that thematic explorations of race usually pivot on the notion that humans are all created equal, regardless of race. However, this position fails to acknowledge the privileged status of whiteness as a racial category. This article examines two recent Australian picture books which explore the relationship between white and non-white identities in an Australian social context, arguing that the construction of whiteness as a normative standard of human experience must be interrogated before genuinely intersubjective race relations can be achieved.' (Author's abstract)
Schemas and Scripts : Cognitive Instruments and the Representation of Cultural Diversity in Children's Literature John Stephens , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Children's Literature and Film 2011; (p. 12-35)
Stephens discusses the use of script and schema as strategies for the representation of cultural diversity in Australian children's literature.
[Review] The Arrival [and] Ziba Came on a Boat Margot Hillel , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Wasafiri , vol. 24 no. 4 2009; (p. 74-76)

— Review of The Arrival Shaun Tan , 2006 single work graphic novel ; Ziba Came on a Boat Liz Lofthouse , 2007 single work picture book
Untitled Hilary Adams , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , April/May vol. 86 no. 8 2007; (p. 23)

— Review of Ziba Came on a Boat Liz Lofthouse , 2007 single work picture book
Under Age Frances Atkinson , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 6 May 2007; (p. 43)

— Review of Mary Bryant : The Impossible Escape Craig Scutt , 2007 single work biography ; Ziba Came on a Boat Liz Lofthouse , 2007 single work picture book
Kids' Lit Jodie Minus , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 May 2007; (p. 12)

— Review of What Bumosaur is That? Andy Griffiths , 2007 single work children's fiction ; Ziba Came on a Boat Liz Lofthouse , 2007 single work picture book ; What Does Blue Feel Like? Jessica Davidson , 2007 single work novel
Group of Eclectic Jewels Stephanie Owen Reeder , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 14 July 2007; (p. 18)

— Review of Shhh! Little Mouse Pamela Allen , 2007 single work picture book ; Whacko the Chook Mark Svendsen , 2007 single work picture book ; Ziba Came on a Boat Liz Lofthouse , 2007 single work picture book ; Dust Colin Thompson , 2007 single work picture book
Untitled Alison Gregg , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 22 no. 3 2007; (p. 30)

— Review of Ziba Came on a Boat Liz Lofthouse , 2007 single work picture book
Kimberley Tales Wins Premier's Fiction Prize Pip Christmass , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 31 October 2008; (p. 9)
The Children's Book Council of Australia Judges' Report 2008 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 52 no. 3 2008; (p. 3 - 9)
Schemas and Scripts : Cognitive Instruments and the Representation of Cultural Diversity in Children's Literature John Stephens , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Children's Literature and Film 2011; (p. 12-35)
Stephens discusses the use of script and schema as strategies for the representation of cultural diversity in Australian children's literature.
A Similarity or Difference : The Problem of Race in Australian Picture Books Victoria Flanagan , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , April vol. 51 no. 2 2013; (p. 13-22)
'The prevailing humanist ideology in fiction produced for children entails that thematic explorations of race usually pivot on the notion that humans are all created equal, regardless of race. However, this position fails to acknowledge the privileged status of whiteness as a racial category. This article examines two recent Australian picture books which explore the relationship between white and non-white identities in an Australian social context, arguing that the construction of whiteness as a normative standard of human experience must be interrogated before genuinely intersubjective race relations can be achieved.' (Author's abstract)
What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 20 Nov 2018 09:28:01
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