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y separately published work icon Lost in the Whitewash : Aboriginal-Asian Encounters in Australia, 1901-2001 anthology   criticism   autobiography   poetry   art work  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 Lost in the Whitewash : Aboriginal-Asian Encounters in Australia, 1901-2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

This collection of essays 'unravels the intricate web of human encounters, spiritual exchanges and cultural traffic between Indigenous peoples and Asians in 19th and 20th-century Australia.' Source: Publisher's blurb

Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,:Australian National University, Humanities Research Centre , 2003 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
As Strands of Plaited Music : My Chinese-Aboriginal-Anglo Heritage, Jennifer A. Martiniello , single work autobiography
Martiniello writes of her family history and sense of identity.
(p. 23-29)
Lunch in Alicei"I sit under the Red Label", Jennifer A. Martiniello , single work poetry (p. 30)
Yearning of the Hearts, Lucy Dann , single work autobiography
Lucy Dann recounts discovering the details and coming to terms with her Japanese heritage. Following her trip to Japan, she writes: 'As a child I did not know what multicultural meant. Now I know. I went looking for my father, and I ended up finding an entire family where parts of me belong' Source: Lost in the Whitewash: Aboriginal-Asian Encounters in Australia, 1901-2001 (2003).
(p. 59-63)
Lucy's Journey : A Photo-Essay, Mayu Kanamori , single work art work (p. 65-68)
A Chinaman in the Woodpile - or a Blackfella in the House?, John Ah Kit , single work autobiography
John Ah Kit writes about his Aboriginal and Chinese heritage and his involvement in politics.
(p. 115-124)
Kung Fu ... It Means Hard Work, Hannah McGlade , single work autobiography
Hannah McGlade writes about her Chinese heritage and her research into the Chinese presence and their experiences in Albany, Western Australia.
(p. 135-142)
Cross-Cultural Alliances : Exploring Aboriginal Asian Literary and Cultural Production, Peta Stephenson , single work criticism
Peta Stephenson surveys Aboriginal-Asian cross-cultural production, considering representations of Aboriginal-Asian relations, influences on the construction of contemporary Aboriginality, and Aboriginal perceptions of Asian identity.
(p. 143-162)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Writing Asian Poetry in English Nicholas Jose , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , June no. 13 2013;

'If you open a collection by a contemporary Australian poet, you’re likely to find poems in forms derived from various Asian literary traditions: haiku, ghazal, tanka and other verse forms that originate in the swathe of cultures from the Arabian Gulf in the West to Japan in the North and Indonesia in the South. This is not new, of course. Nineteenth-century French poets, including Baudelaire, were attracted by the pantoum (pantun), a traditional Malay verse form. John Ashbery and other Americans followed suit in the twentieth-century. Contemporary Australian poet Mike Ladd acknowledges this lineage in ‘Pantuns in the Orchard’ (Island, Spring 2011), a recent essay about his experiments with the form during a residency at Rimbun Dahan in Malaysia.' (Author's introduction)

Writing Asian Poetry in English Nicholas Jose , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , June no. 13 2013;

'If you open a collection by a contemporary Australian poet, you’re likely to find poems in forms derived from various Asian literary traditions: haiku, ghazal, tanka and other verse forms that originate in the swathe of cultures from the Arabian Gulf in the West to Japan in the North and Indonesia in the South. This is not new, of course. Nineteenth-century French poets, including Baudelaire, were attracted by the pantoum (pantun), a traditional Malay verse form. John Ashbery and other Americans followed suit in the twentieth-century. Contemporary Australian poet Mike Ladd acknowledges this lineage in ‘Pantuns in the Orchard’ (Island, Spring 2011), a recent essay about his experiments with the form during a residency at Rimbun Dahan in Malaysia.' (Author's introduction)

Last amended 12 Jan 2010 09:45:12
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