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Nhill single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2006... 2006 Nhill
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Best Australian Stories 2006 Robert Drewe (editor), Melbourne : Black Inc. , 2006 Z1325846 2006 anthology short story extract Melbourne : Black Inc. , 2006 pg. 130-137
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Antipodes vol. 20 no. 2 December 2006 Z1355030 2006 periodical issue 2006 pg. 193-196
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Penguin Book of the Road Delia Falconer (editor), Camberwell : Viking , 2008 Z1532526 2008 anthology short story biography travel

    'Australia is a nation of drivers. We spend more time behind the wheel than almost anyone else, on fast highways, lonely bush tracks, jammed city lanes and suburban streets. The road is the place where the great dramas of our lives unfold, the route to our greatest pleasures as well as our worst nightmares. It is sexy, dangerous and unnerving.

    'In this landmark collection, acclaimed novelist and essayist Delia Falconer brings together some of our very best writing on every aspect of the road.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Camberwell : Viking , 2008
    pg. 61-70
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Cracking the Spine : Ten Short Stories and How They Were Written Julie Chevalier (editor), Bronwyn Mehan (editor), Strawberry Hills : Spineless Wonders , 2014 7482882 2014 anthology short story essay (taught in 1 units) Strawberry Hills : Spineless Wonders , 2014 pg. 145-153

Works about this Work

‘Nhill’ and the Aboriginal Language Revival Movement : Relational Identity, Short Story Titles and ‘contracts of Homophony’ Patrick West , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 21 no. 1 2017;
'This article takes a practice-led research approach to engage with a current debate in Australian post-colonialism centred on the language issues involved with the Aboriginal Language Revival movement. Using the author’s own short story, ‘Nhill’, as a case study, the article develops Amos Oz’s notion of the beginning of a story as a ‘contract’ that all texts make with their readers. ‘Nhill’ is a provocative instance of this sort of contract because it is an English-language corruption, and mis-hearing, of the Aboriginal word, ‘nyell’. Nhill is also a town on the edge of the Little Desert in the Wimmera region of Western Victoria. The article explores the relationship of this place to the implications of the contract that the title ‘Nhill’ makes with its readers. By tracking the practice-led shift in the title of the story from, originally, the English-language name ‘Little Desert’, through to ‘Nhill’ as a homophonic echo of ‘nyell’, the article explores the ethical implications of a ‘contract of homophony’ for the current debate around the Aboriginal Language Revival movement. However, because ‘Nhill’s’ author is a non-indigenous researcher involved in the field of Aboriginal Language Revival, the article’s focus on ‘homophonic ethics’ must itself be situated ethically. ' (Publication abstract)
Writing 'Nhill' : The Short Story as Still Life Patrick West , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Cracking the Spine : Ten Short Stories and How They Were Written 2014; (p. 154-162)
Writing 'Nhill' : The Short Story as Still Life Patrick West , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Cracking the Spine : Ten Short Stories and How They Were Written 2014; (p. 154-162)
‘Nhill’ and the Aboriginal Language Revival Movement : Relational Identity, Short Story Titles and ‘contracts of Homophony’ Patrick West , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 21 no. 1 2017;
'This article takes a practice-led research approach to engage with a current debate in Australian post-colonialism centred on the language issues involved with the Aboriginal Language Revival movement. Using the author’s own short story, ‘Nhill’, as a case study, the article develops Amos Oz’s notion of the beginning of a story as a ‘contract’ that all texts make with their readers. ‘Nhill’ is a provocative instance of this sort of contract because it is an English-language corruption, and mis-hearing, of the Aboriginal word, ‘nyell’. Nhill is also a town on the edge of the Little Desert in the Wimmera region of Western Victoria. The article explores the relationship of this place to the implications of the contract that the title ‘Nhill’ makes with its readers. By tracking the practice-led shift in the title of the story from, originally, the English-language name ‘Little Desert’, through to ‘Nhill’ as a homophonic echo of ‘nyell’, the article explores the ethical implications of a ‘contract of homophony’ for the current debate around the Aboriginal Language Revival movement. However, because ‘Nhill’s’ author is a non-indigenous researcher involved in the field of Aboriginal Language Revival, the article’s focus on ‘homophonic ethics’ must itself be situated ethically. ' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 1 Oct 2014 13:35:08
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  • Nhill - Dimboola - Albacutya area, North West Victoria, Victoria,
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