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Peter Sumner as Bill Hayden and Max Phipps as Gough Whitlam are heckled by Bill Hunter's Rex Conner. (Source: Screen cap)
form y separately published work icon The Dismissal series - publisher   film/TV   historical fiction  
Note: Story outline by Ron Blair.
Issue Details: First known date: 1982... 1982 The Dismissal
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Dramatisation of the political events leading up to the dismissal of the Whitlam government on November 11th 1975.

Notes

  • Mini-series.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

What Do Mad Max's Six Oscars Mean for the Australian Film Industry? Vincent O'Donnell , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 1 March 2016;
'The career of Dr George Miller reminds me of that of Charles Chauvel, one of the greatest showmen of the Australian cinema. Both men – though separated by many decades – have employed epic cinematic forms and nationalistic themes. ...'
The Petrov Affair : An Ambivalent Migrant Narrative Greg Dolgopolov , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 24 August vol. 5 no. 2 2011; (p. 121-130)
'Well after the end of the Culture Wars, the televisual representations of The Petrov Affair continue to flourish. `The Petrov Affair' profoundly changed the Australian ideals of modernity and conception of Communism, political espionage and migration in the 1950s. The 1987 miniseries The Petrov Affair (Michael Carson) was released at the height of the 1980s promotion of multiculturalism and the historical miniseries boom. It is not a spy thriller, nor a courtroom drama about the Royal Commission. The Petrov Affair is a delicate character study of the difficulties of deciding to immigrate and the ambivalence that lies at the nexus between modernity and migration. This article seeks to rehabilitate this forgotten docudrama and examine the relationship between modernity, mobility and migration in the cultural production that explored emerging multicultural policies. (Editor's abstract)
Look Back in Anger Tom Krause , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 November 2006; (p. 24-25)

— Review of The Dismissal Terry Hayes , Ron Blair , 1982 series - publisher film/TV
Look Back in Anger Tom Krause , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 November 2006; (p. 24-25)

— Review of The Dismissal Terry Hayes , Ron Blair , 1982 series - publisher film/TV
The Petrov Affair : An Ambivalent Migrant Narrative Greg Dolgopolov , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 24 August vol. 5 no. 2 2011; (p. 121-130)
'Well after the end of the Culture Wars, the televisual representations of The Petrov Affair continue to flourish. `The Petrov Affair' profoundly changed the Australian ideals of modernity and conception of Communism, political espionage and migration in the 1950s. The 1987 miniseries The Petrov Affair (Michael Carson) was released at the height of the 1980s promotion of multiculturalism and the historical miniseries boom. It is not a spy thriller, nor a courtroom drama about the Royal Commission. The Petrov Affair is a delicate character study of the difficulties of deciding to immigrate and the ambivalence that lies at the nexus between modernity and migration. This article seeks to rehabilitate this forgotten docudrama and examine the relationship between modernity, mobility and migration in the cultural production that explored emerging multicultural policies. (Editor's abstract)
What Do Mad Max's Six Oscars Mean for the Australian Film Industry? Vincent O'Donnell , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 1 March 2016;
'The career of Dr George Miller reminds me of that of Charles Chauvel, one of the greatest showmen of the Australian cinema. Both men – though separated by many decades – have employed epic cinematic forms and nationalistic themes. ...'
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