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y separately published work icon Ten Things I Hate about Me single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 2006... 2006 Ten Things I Hate about Me
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

There are a lot of things Jamie hates about her life: her dark hair, her dad's Stone Age Charter of Curfew Rights, her real name - Jamilah Towfeek. For the past three years Jamie has hidden her Lebanese background from everyone at school. It's only with her email friend John that she can really be herself. But now things are getting complicated: the most popular boy in school is interested in her, but there's no way he would be if he knew the truth. Then there's Timothy, the school loner, who for some reason Jamie just can't stop thinking about. As for John, he seems to have a pretty big secret of his own. (Source: Trove)

Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it has Lebanese characters, and references to Muslim culture.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Marion Lloyd Books ,
      2007 .
      image of person or book cover 6538699625971606545.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 303p.
      Note/s:
      • Published August 1st 2007
      ISBN: 9780439943710
Alternative title: Ti ting jeg hader ved mig selv
Language: Danish
    • c
      Denmark,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sesam ,
      2007 .
      image of person or book cover 4468834625636736067.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 280p.
      ISBN: 9788711314791

Works about this Work

Minority Within : 2nd Generation Young Adult Muslim Australian in Ten Things I Hate about Me Raihanah Mohd Mydin , Norzalimah Mohd , Ruzy Suliza Hashim , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: 3L : Language, Linguistics, Literature , vol. 19 no. 3 2013; (p. 61-70)

'It is undeniable that in the era of globalisation, the young adults’ world is becoming ever fluid and expandable. For the young adult of minority descent, the challenges are made more complex given the contestation with the majority culture of the land. This paper investigates the contestation of marginalization by a Muslim young adult in multi-ethnic, multi-cultural Australia as portrayed in Randa Abdel-Fattah’s second novel entitled Ten Things I Hate About Me. The paper discusses two fundamental identity spaces within the discourse of multiculturalism – private and public, and examines how the social, cultural and religious spaces inhabited by the young adult minority protagonist influence her in the formation of her identity as a member of a minority community in a predominantly white majority society. Pitted as the ‘minority within’ for the marginalization that the protagonist feels within her immediate family circle, the experience of the young adult minority, as this paper suggests, is ever complex and uncertain.' (Publication abstract)

Hyphenated Girls : Australian-Muslim Identity in the Novels of Randa Abdel-Fattah Alice Nuttall , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: IBBYLink , Autumn 2010; (p. 12-14)
Muslim Teen Heroines in Randa Absel-Fattah's Young Adult Novels Does My Head Look Big in This? and Ten Things I Hate about Me Amy Cummins , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Belief , vol. 30 no. 2 2010; (p. 63-79)
Speaking for Ourselves Mike Shuttleworth , Randa Abdel-Fattah , Amra Pajalic , Libby Gleeson , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Newsletter of the Australian Centre for Youth Literature , July no. 2 2009; (p. 8-9)
This column is an edited abstract of the panel discussion 'Growing up Muslim in Australia', which took place at the 2009 Reading Matters conference in Victoria. The panel was chaired by Mike Shuttleworth and consisted of Randa Abdel-Fattah, Amra Pajalic and Libby Gleeson. An audio of the full discussion is available at insideadog.com.au/downloads.
Abdel-Fattah Wins Kathleen Mitchell Award 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , July vol. 88 no. 1 2008; (p. 6)
Kids' Lit Jodie Minus , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30 September - 1 October 2006; (p. 14)

— Review of The Arrival Shaun Tan , 2006 single work graphic novel ; Ten Things I Hate about Me Randa Abdel-Fattah , 2006 single work novel
Under Age Frances Atkinson , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 1 October 2006; (p. 47)

— Review of Mokie and Bik Wendy Orr , 2006 single work children's fiction ; The Thirsty Flowers Tony Wilson , 2006 single work picture book ; Ten Things I Hate about Me Randa Abdel-Fattah , 2006 single work novel
Passionate Worlds Kathy Kozlowski , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 285 2006; (p. 58-60)

— Review of Monica Bloom Nick Earls , 2006 single work novel ; Ten Things I Hate about Me Randa Abdel-Fattah , 2006 single work novel ; The Birthmark Beth Montgomery , 2006 single work novel ; Will Maria Boyd , 2006 single work novel ; The Secret Life of Maeve Lee Kwong Kirsty Murray , 2006 single work children's fiction ; The Betrayal of Bindy Mackenzie Jaclyn Moriarty , 2006 single work novel ; On the Jellicoe Road Melina Marchetta , 2006 single work novel ; Red Spikes Margo Lanagan , 2006 selected work short story ; One Whole and Perfect Day Judith Clarke , 2006 single work novel ; Notes from the Teenage Underground Simmone Howell , 2006 single work novel
Untitled Mike Shuttleworth , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Newsletter of the Australian Centre for Youth Literature , October no. 2 2006; (p. 16)

— Review of Ten Things I Hate about Me Randa Abdel-Fattah , 2006 single work novel
Books Kids Emma Rodgers , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 28 - 29 October 2006; (p. 34)

— Review of Ten Things I Hate about Me Randa Abdel-Fattah , 2006 single work novel
Middle Eastern Appearance Rosemary Neill , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 September 2006; (p. 4-6)
Multicultural Stepping Stones Jodie Minus , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , October vol. 1 no. 2 2006; (p. 10)
Jodie Minus looks at the trajectory of Melina Marchetta's career from 'multicultural' to mainstream writer. Minus expresses the hope that Randa Abdel-Fattah will travel a similar path. 'We should look forward to the day', says Minus, 'when Abdel-Fattah no longer writes only about the problems facing Muslims, but about issues faced by all sorts of Australians'.
Lifting the Veil on the Islam Experience Taghred Chandab , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 5 November 2006; (p. 83)
Abdel-Fattah Wins Kathleen Mitchell Award 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , July vol. 88 no. 1 2008; (p. 6)
Embodying a Racialised Multiculturalism : Strategic Essentialism and Lived Hybridities in Hoa Pham's No One Like Me Debra Dudek , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 17 no. 2 2007; (p. 43-49)
Debra Dudek is interested in the intersection of multiculturalism, cultural citizenship and children's literature and in this article looks at the 'tension between representing an acceptance of cultural difference...and representing all people within one culture as the same' (43). She locates her analysis within the field of Asian-Australian studies through a discussion of Hoa Pham's No One Like Me (1998), the story of a young Vietnamese girl who lives in Australia with her family, arguing that the text 'simultaneously highlights and deconstructs gender and the Asian family as homogenous categories' (43). Framing the analysis with a discussion of the Howard Government's approach to cultural diversity and its viewpoint that 'immigrants from Asia threaten the notion of a unified Australia', Dudek draws attention to the 'turbulent past and uncertain future' of multiculturalism which, she argues, relies on 'concepts of sameness and difference' that fundamentally support and maintain policies of assimilation (43-44). Dudek posits that No One Like Me negotiates the question of 'how to recognize and accept race and gender strategically as essential categories of difference without homogenising them' (45) in a way which destabilizes 'neat and static categories of otherness' and 'opens up the possibility of multiple subject positions [and] complex lived hybridities' (48).
Last amended 19 Apr 2018 12:01:46
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