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Issue Details: First known date: 1993... 1993 The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • South Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Oxford University Press , 1993 .
      Extent: 381p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 0195530578, 0929090713

Works about this Work

True Australians? Then and Now Heather Stallard , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , November no. 23 2008; (p. 240-245)
‘Since 1788, when Great Britain established a penal colony at Sydney, and the ‘first fleet’ arrived with their seven hundred and seventeen prisoners, Australians have had to grapple with the subject of their identity – British, but also clearly ‘other’. To understand their dilemma, it is important to take a look at the early history of white settlement and the attitudes that prevailed at that time, not only amongst the convicts themselves, but also amongst their oppressors.’ (p. 240)
Folklore and Schools : The View from the Desk James Robert Smith , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , November no. 23 2008; (p. 188-195)
‘Over the last fifty years Children’s Folklore has established itself as a serious subject for study. From the beginning, schools have been seen as rich sites for the transmission of – and thus the recording of – Children’s Folklore.’ (p. 188)
Untitled Howard George , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 37 no. 3 1993; (p. 43)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
Ned and the Don Michael Davie , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 20 August no. 4716 1993; (p. 9)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
An Encyclopaedic Companion Kenneth S. Goldstein , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 131 1993; (p. 78-79)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
Untitled Howard George , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 37 no. 3 1993; (p. 43)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
Short on Dad and Dave, Long on Karagiozis Robert Holden , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 150 1993; (p. 21)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
Australian Folklore Revealed 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Incite , 8 March vol. 14 no. 2 1993; (p. 14)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
Folk to the Fore Edmund Campion , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 23 March vol. 115 no. 5862 1993; (p. 115)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
An Encyclopaedic Companion Kenneth S. Goldstein , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 131 1993; (p. 78-79)

— Review of The Oxford Companion to Australian Folklore 1993 reference criticism bibliography
Folklore and Schools : The View from the Desk James Robert Smith , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , November no. 23 2008; (p. 188-195)
‘Over the last fifty years Children’s Folklore has established itself as a serious subject for study. From the beginning, schools have been seen as rich sites for the transmission of – and thus the recording of – Children’s Folklore.’ (p. 188)
True Australians? Then and Now Heather Stallard , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , November no. 23 2008; (p. 240-245)
‘Since 1788, when Great Britain established a penal colony at Sydney, and the ‘first fleet’ arrived with their seven hundred and seventeen prisoners, Australians have had to grapple with the subject of their identity – British, but also clearly ‘other’. To understand their dilemma, it is important to take a look at the early history of white settlement and the attitudes that prevailed at that time, not only amongst the convicts themselves, but also amongst their oppressors.’ (p. 240)
Last amended 17 Oct 2007 13:12:28
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