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The Obstinacy of the Sacred single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005... 2005 The Obstinacy of the Sacred
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Examines contemporary Australian literature with the view that 'the sacred is at once a powerful symptom of postcolonial disquiet and a path of flight that promises to lead beyond this, and beyond history itself'. (p. 157)

Exhibitions

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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Antipodes The Sacred in Australian Literature vol. 19 no. 2 December 2005 Z1251555 2005 periodical issue 2005 pg. 152-157

Works about this Work

‘Shapely Experience’ and the Limits of ‘Late Colonial Transcendentalism’ : The Portrait of the Artist as Soldier in Roger McDonald’s 1915 Christopher Lee , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'This essay argues that Roger McDonald's debut novel 1915 represents a form of literary modernism which rejects the easy aesthetic comforts of 'late colonial transcendentalism' (17). McDonald presents an intricate -- we might even say ritualised -- pattern of subversive counterpoint to 'reveal and dramatise the failure of the subject to escape its own limits, and hence its own history' (McCann 155). The result is a highly self-conscious literary novel that seeks to reconcile the art of high modernism with a postcolonial practice interested in the consequences of public memory.' (Author's abstract)
‘Shapely Experience’ and the Limits of ‘Late Colonial Transcendentalism’ : The Portrait of the Artist as Soldier in Roger McDonald’s 1915 Christopher Lee , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'This essay argues that Roger McDonald's debut novel 1915 represents a form of literary modernism which rejects the easy aesthetic comforts of 'late colonial transcendentalism' (17). McDonald presents an intricate -- we might even say ritualised -- pattern of subversive counterpoint to 'reveal and dramatise the failure of the subject to escape its own limits, and hence its own history' (McCann 155). The result is a highly self-conscious literary novel that seeks to reconcile the art of high modernism with a postcolonial practice interested in the consequences of public memory.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 4 Apr 2006 17:25:41
152-157 The Obstinacy of the Sacredsmall AustLit logo Antipodes
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