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y separately published work icon Tell Me Why single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 Tell Me Why
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A true story about a young girl's search for identity and desire to understand her Aboriginality. Seven-year-old Sarah goes back to her great-grandmother and asks questions about her family. This feel-good story looks at how family history shapes our childhood journeys.' Source: Publisher's blurb.

Exhibitions

8709801
8711002

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2004 .
      image of person or book cover 8178242802709921909.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of the publisher.
      Extent: 31p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Reprinted: 2011 Originally published: Broome, Western Australia ; Magabala Books, 2004.
      ISBN: 1875641963

Works about this Work

BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2)
'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.' (Author's introduction)
Aboriginal Children's Literature : More Than Just Pretty Pictures Anita Heiss , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Just Words? : Australian Authors Writing for Justice 2008; (p. 102-117) The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 7)

'This essay explores how some recent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authored titles have used local languages and personal histories - including complex stories which deal with the Stolen Generations - to engage and educate young Australian readers, while providing much needed inspiration to nurture Indigenous audiences.' (Source: Heiss, Anita, Aboriginal Literature for Children: More Than Just Pretty Pictures, 2015)

Are You Talking to Me? : Hailing the Reader in Indigenous Children's Literature Penelope Davie , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 112-117)
This analysis discusses two indigenous authored children's texts, My Girragundji (Meme McDonald and Boori Pryor) and Tell Me Why (Robyn Templeton and Sarah Jackson), in relation to critical strategies, audience address and textual authorisation. In particular, Davie looks at 'paratexts' - the material that comes before and after a text, including blurbs, introductions, acknowledgements, titles, covers, art - as an interpellation device (112). Drawing upon the concept of interpellation, or the way in which the subject is addressed by the 'authority of the state', Davie argues that the paratexts of contemporary Indigenous texts offer an 'entry point' for the direct voice of the author who can 'hail readers' without the mediation of white voices, which (in the pas) have not only spoken for Indigenous people, but had the power to police their voices and frame the narrative in ways that suited a non-Indigenous audience (116).
[Review] Tell Me Why Sharon Seymour , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 49 no. 2 2005; (p. 23)

— Review of Tell Me Why Robyn Templeton Sarah Jackson 2004 single work picture book
[Review] Tell Me Why Amelia Pulver , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 48 no. 4 2004; (p. 23)

— Review of Tell Me Why Robyn Templeton Sarah Jackson 2004 single work picture book
[Review] Tell Me Why Sharon Seymour , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 49 no. 2 2005; (p. 23)

— Review of Tell Me Why Robyn Templeton Sarah Jackson 2004 single work picture book
[Review] Tell Me Why Amelia Pulver , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 48 no. 4 2004; (p. 23)

— Review of Tell Me Why Robyn Templeton Sarah Jackson 2004 single work picture book
Are You Talking to Me? : Hailing the Reader in Indigenous Children's Literature Penelope Davie , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 112-117)
This analysis discusses two indigenous authored children's texts, My Girragundji (Meme McDonald and Boori Pryor) and Tell Me Why (Robyn Templeton and Sarah Jackson), in relation to critical strategies, audience address and textual authorisation. In particular, Davie looks at 'paratexts' - the material that comes before and after a text, including blurbs, introductions, acknowledgements, titles, covers, art - as an interpellation device (112). Drawing upon the concept of interpellation, or the way in which the subject is addressed by the 'authority of the state', Davie argues that the paratexts of contemporary Indigenous texts offer an 'entry point' for the direct voice of the author who can 'hail readers' without the mediation of white voices, which (in the pas) have not only spoken for Indigenous people, but had the power to police their voices and frame the narrative in ways that suited a non-Indigenous audience (116).
Aboriginal Children's Literature : More Than Just Pretty Pictures Anita Heiss , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Just Words? : Australian Authors Writing for Justice 2008; (p. 102-117) The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 7)

'This essay explores how some recent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authored titles have used local languages and personal histories - including complex stories which deal with the Stolen Generations - to engage and educate young Australian readers, while providing much needed inspiration to nurture Indigenous audiences.' (Source: Heiss, Anita, Aboriginal Literature for Children: More Than Just Pretty Pictures, 2015)

BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2)
'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 23 Jun 2015 11:30:52
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