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Abstract of Belonging Where? by Lorraine McGee-Sippel, 1997
Belonging Where? single work   poetry   "Caught in an abyss / Belonging where?"
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 Belonging Where?
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Exhibitions

6939401
8711002

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Message Stick : Contemporary Aboriginal Writing Kerry Reed-Gilbert (editor), Alice Springs : IAD Press , 1997 Z419921 1997 anthology short story poetry

    '...Message Stick is a collection of poems and short stories that defies the expected. Drawing from the contemporary, traditional and urban life experiences of established and emerging writers, Message Stick is an Aboriginal view of black culture, past, present and future. It is not manufactured dialogue by those 'who think they know', it is the many and diverse voices of Aboriginal Australia.' (Backcover)

    Alice Springs : IAD Press , 1997
    pg. 41
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Koori Mail no. 149 23 April 1997 6121682 1997 newspaper issue 1997 pg. 6
    Note: Available online as a PDF. Scroll down to p. 6.
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Many Voices : Reflections on Experiences of Indigenous Child Separation Anna Haebich (editor), Doreen Mellor (editor), Canberra : 2002 Z1492142 2002 anthology oral history poetry lyric/song This anthology is the culmination of four years of archiving diverse stories about the removal of Indigenous children from their families. The project was known as the 'Bringing Them Home Oral History Project' conducted by National Library of Australia and included a collection of 340 interviews. The stories and poetry included in this anthology are the voices of personal experiences and memories of a diverse group of people from every State and Territory including cottage parents, police officers, mothers and/or relinquished babies. Subjects covered include government policy, missions and childhood trauma. Source: http://www.nla.gov.au/ (Sighted: 27/07/09). Canberra : 2002 pg. 69
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Stolen Generations' Testimonies Board of the Stolen Generations’ Testimonies Foundation , 2007 8960307 2007 website

    'The ‘Stolen Generations’ Testimonies’ project is an initiative to record on film the personal testimonies of Australia’s Stolen Generations Survivors and share them online.'

    'The Stolen Generations' Testimonies Foundation hopes the online museum will become a national treasure and a unique and sacred keeping place for Stolen Generations’ Survivors’ Testimonies. By allowing Australians to listen to the Survivors’ stories with open hearts and without judgement, the foundation hopes more people will be engaged in the healing process. ' (Source: Stolen Generations Testimonies website)

    2007

Works about this Work

BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2)
'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.' (Author's introduction)
BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2)
'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 30 Jan 2018 08:53:56
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