AustLit logo
person or book cover
Image sourced from the University of Sydney, Fisher Library
y separately published work icon The Lost Explorers : A Story of the Trackless Desert single work   children's fiction   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 1907... 1907 The Lost Explorers : A Story of the Trackless Desert
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Latest Issues

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Bob Wentworth, 18, and Jack Armstrong, 16, leave their work at the Clyde Engineering Works and set off to Australia with Mr Mackay in search of gold. The story moves from the goldfields of WA across the centre of Australia. The character of Mackay is based on Macdonald himself. He is engimatic, an able fighter, and a sensitive flautist who has a broad general knowledge (which he is not averse to imparting freely) and is moved to tears by music.'

(Oxford Companion to Australian Children's Literature 271).

Exhibitions

9365530

Notes

  • Dedication: To B.B.
  • Users are warned that this work contains terminology that reflects attitudes or language used at the time of publication that are considered inappropriate today.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Blackie ,
      1907 .
      person or book cover
      Image sourced from the University of Sydney, Fisher Library
      Extent: vi, 380p., [8] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Preface pp v-vi.
      • Digitised by AustLit, 2010, from the collection of the NLA.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Blackie ,
      1923 .
      Extent: 379 p., [6] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Illustrated by Arthur H. Buckland.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Blackie ,
      1936 .
      Extent: 379p.
      Description: illus. by Arthur H. Buckland
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Blackie ,
      1948 .
      Extent: 379 p., [4] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.

Works about this Work

Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Fabulating the Australian Desert : Australia's Lost Race Romances, 1890-1908 Melissa Bellanta , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Philament , April no. 3 2004;
y separately published work icon Mobilising Fictions or, Romancing the Australian Desert, 1890-1908 Melissa Bellanta , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z1238252 2003 single work criticism 'This paper looks at Australia's "lost race romances", published between 1890 and 1908, so-called because they described the discovery of an unknown race in the middle of the Australian desert...' (Author's abstract)
y separately published work icon Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon , Oakleigh : Cambridge University Press , 1995 Z480378 1995 single work criticism

'This book is an exploration of popular late nineteenth-century texts that show Australia - along with Africa, India and the Pacific Islands - to be a preferred site of imperial adventure. Focusing on the period from the advent of the new imperialism in the 1870s to the outbreak of World War I, Robert Dixon looks at a selection of British and Australian writers. Their books, he argues, offer insights into the construction of empire, masculinity, race, and Australian nationhood and identity. Writing the Colonial Adventure shows that the genre of adventure/romance was highly popular throughout this period. The book examines the variety of themes within their narrative form that captured many aspects of imperial ideology. In considering the broader ramifications of these works, Professor Dixon develops an original approach to popular fiction, both for its own sake and as a mode of cultural history.' (Introduction)

Ludwig Leichhardt : Australia's Missing Penis Simon Ryan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coppertales : A Journal of Rural Arts , no. 1 1994; (p. 97-106) The Body in the Library 1998; (p. 237-247)
Fabulating the Australian Desert : Australia's Lost Race Romances, 1890-1908 Melissa Bellanta , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Philament , April no. 3 2004;
y separately published work icon Mobilising Fictions or, Romancing the Australian Desert, 1890-1908 Melissa Bellanta , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z1238252 2003 single work criticism 'This paper looks at Australia's "lost race romances", published between 1890 and 1908, so-called because they described the discovery of an unknown race in the middle of the Australian desert...' (Author's abstract)
Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Ludwig Leichhardt : Australia's Missing Penis Simon Ryan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coppertales : A Journal of Rural Arts , no. 1 1994; (p. 97-106) The Body in the Library 1998; (p. 237-247)
y separately published work icon Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon , Oakleigh : Cambridge University Press , 1995 Z480378 1995 single work criticism

'This book is an exploration of popular late nineteenth-century texts that show Australia - along with Africa, India and the Pacific Islands - to be a preferred site of imperial adventure. Focusing on the period from the advent of the new imperialism in the 1870s to the outbreak of World War I, Robert Dixon looks at a selection of British and Australian writers. Their books, he argues, offer insights into the construction of empire, masculinity, race, and Australian nationhood and identity. Writing the Colonial Adventure shows that the genre of adventure/romance was highly popular throughout this period. The book examines the variety of themes within their narrative form that captured many aspects of imperial ideology. In considering the broader ramifications of these works, Professor Dixon develops an original approach to popular fiction, both for its own sake and as a mode of cultural history.' (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Apr 2016 13:48:55
Settings:
  • Central desert areas, Western Australia,
  • 1890s
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X