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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y The Proposition single work   film/TV   thriller   western   crime  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005... 2005 The Proposition
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Set in the 1880s, [The Proposition] opens in the middle of a frenzied gunfight between the police and a gang of outlaws. Charlie Burns ... and his brother Mikey are captured by Captain Stanley... Together with their psychopathic brother Arthur, ... they are wanted for a brutal crime. Stanley makes Charlie a seemingly impossible proposition in an attempt to bring an end to the cycle of bloody violence.'


Source: Nick Cave's website (http://www.nickcaveandthebadseeds.com/)

Sighted: 20/09/2005

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The 100 Best Australian Films of the New Millenium Erin Free , Dov Kornits , Travis Johnson , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 22 September 2016;
y Finding Queensland in Australian Cinema : Poetics and Screen Geographies Allison Craven , New York (City) : Anthem Press , 2016 11063066 2016 multi chapter work criticism

'‘Finding Queensland in Australian Cinema’ comprises eight essays, an introduction and conclusion, and the analysis of poetics and cultural geographies is focused on landmark films and television. The first section of the book, ‘Backtracks: Landscape and Identity’, refers to films from and before the revival, beginning with the 1978 film 'The Irishman' as an example of heritage cinema in which performances of gender and race, like the setting, suggest a romanticised and uncritical image of colonial Australia. It is compared to Baz Luhrmann’s 'Australia' (2008) and several other films. In the second chapter, ‘Heritage Enigmatic’, 'The Irishman' is also drawn into comparison with Charles Chauvel’s ‘Jedda’ (1955), as films that incorporate Indigenous performances in this heritage discourse through the role of voice and sound. In Part 2, ‘Silences in Paradise’, the first essay, ‘Tropical Gothic’, focuses on Rachel Perkins’s 'Radiance' (1998) as a landmark post-colonial film that questions the connotations of icons of paradise in Queensland. The discussion leads to films, in the next chapter, ‘Island Girls Friday’, that figure women on Queensland islands, spanning the pre-revival and contemporary era: ‘Age of Consent’ (1969), ‘Nim’s Island’ (2008) and ‘Uninhabited’ (2010). Part 3, ‘Masculine Dramas of the Coast’ moves to the Gold Coast, in films dating from before and since the current spike in transnational production at the Warner Roadshow film studios there, namely, 'The Coolangatta Gold' (1984), 'Peter Pan' (2003), and 'Sanctum' (2011). The final section, ‘Regional Backtracks’, turns, first, to two television series, ‘Remote Area Nurse’ (2006), and ‘The Straits’ (2012), that share unique provenance of production in the Torres Strait and far north regions of Queensland, while, in the final chapter, the iconic outback districts of western Queensland figure the convergence of land, landscape and location in films with potent perspectives on Indigenous histories in ‘The Proposition’ (2005) and ‘Mystery Road’ (2013). ‘Finding Queensland in Australian Cinema’ presents the various regions as syncretic spaces subject to transitions of social and industry practices over time.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Character Piece : Charlie Burns in The Proposition Erin Free , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 29 February 2016;
The Proposition : Imagining Race, Family and Violence on the Nineteenth-Century Australian Frontier Catriona Elder , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ilha Do Desterro : A Journal of English Language , vol. 69 no. 2 2016;
'This article analyses John Hillcoat’s 2005 film The Proposition in relation to a spate of Australian films about violence and the (post)colonial encounter released in the early twenty-first century. Extending on Felicity Collins and Therese Davis argument that these films can be read in terms of the ways they capture or refract aspects of contemporary race relations in Australia in a post-Mabo, this article analyses how The Proposition reconstructs the trauma of the Australian frontier; how from the perspective of the twenty-first century it worries over the meaning of violence on the Australian frontier. It also explores what has become speakable (and remains unspeakable) in the public sphere about the history of the frontier encounter, especially in terms of family and race. The article argues that The Proposition and other early twenty-first century race relations films can be understood as post-reconciliation films, emerging in a period when Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians were rethinking ideas of belonging through a prism of post-enmity and forgiveness. Drawing on the theme of violence and intimate relations in the film, this article argues that the challenges to the everyday formulation of Australian history proffered in The Proposition reveal painful and powerful differences amongst Australian citizens’ understanding of who belongs and how they came to belong to the nation. I suggest that by focusing on violence in terms of intimacy, relationships, family and kin, it is possible to see this film presented an opportunity to begin to refigure ideas of belonging. ' (Publication abstract)
The Proposition Rewatched – Outback Western Mixes Violence and Profundity Luke Buckmaster , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 30 January 2015;

— Review of The Proposition Nick Cave 2005 single work film/TV
No Hero to be Found Evan Williams , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 8-9 October 2005; (p. 23)

— Review of The Proposition Nick Cave 2005 single work film/TV
Movie of the Week Doug Anderson , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 4 January 2010; (p. 18)

— Review of The Proposition Nick Cave 2005 single work film/TV
The Proposition Rewatched – Outback Western Mixes Violence and Profundity Luke Buckmaster , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 30 January 2015;

— Review of The Proposition Nick Cave 2005 single work film/TV
Nick and John's Excellent Adventure Stephen Dalton , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 25 September 2005; (p. 4)
The Evening Redness in the West William D. Routt , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 1 October 2005; (p. 8)
Discusses the way in which violence is presented in the film.
Western Values Derek Rielly , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Limelight , October 2005; (p. 32-33)
Written in Blood Sacha Molitorisz , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 October 2005; (p. 5)
Films with Backbone Stephen Matchett , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 November 2005; (p. 40)
Last amended 11 Mar 2015 14:35:33
Settings:
  • Queensland,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
  • 1890s
  • 1880s
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