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y separately published work icon Affection : A Novel single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005... 2005 Affection : A Novel
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Attempts by two doctors to deal with an outbreak of plague in Townsville at the turn of the century reveals much about the workings of political and personal relationships.

Notes

  • Dedication: For my lovely wife, Kirsty.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Fourth Estate , 2005 .
      Extent: 404p.
      Description: illus., port.
      ISBN: 0732280559
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Harper Perennial , 2005 .
      Extent: 404pp.
      Edition info: 2nd Edition, 2007.
      ISBN: 0732280559

Works about this Work

Our Stories 2012 selected work extract
— Appears in: Writing Queensland , October no. 223 2012; (p. 6-7)
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

Learning from Forgotten Epidemics Ian Townsend , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Spring no. 17 2007; (p. 57-65)
Getting It Right the First Time Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , July vol. 2 no. 6 2007; (p. 16-17)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel ; Passarola Rising Azhar Abidi , 2006 single work novel ; Feather Man Rhyll McMaster , 2007 single work novel ; The Scandal of the Season Sophie Gee , 2007 single work novel
Untitled Tim Coronel , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , May vol. 84 no. 10 2005; (p. 24)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel
Grip of the Vortex Peter Pierce , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 271 2005; (p. 50)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel
Fiction Lorien Kaye , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 14 May 2005; (p. 6)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel
Just What the Doctor Ordered Ross Fitzgerald , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14-15 May 2005; (p. 10)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel
Take Three Ian McFarlane , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Canberra Sunday Times , 22 May 2005; (p. 14)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel ; The Rose Notes : A Novel Andrea Mayes , 2005 single work novel
Plague Calls for Dose of Humour Guy Mosel , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 April - 1 May 2005; (p. 8)

— Review of Affection : A Novel Ian Townsend , 2005 single work novel
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

Learning from Forgotten Epidemics Ian Townsend , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Spring no. 17 2007; (p. 57-65)
Our Stories 2012 selected work extract
— Appears in: Writing Queensland , October no. 223 2012; (p. 6-7)
Last amended 20 Feb 2012 15:30:40
Settings:
  • Townsville, Townsville area, Marlborough - Mackay - Townsville area, Queensland,
  • Brisbane, Queensland,
  • 1900
  • 1921
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