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y separately published work icon Dead Europe single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005... 2005 Dead Europe
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The novel comprises two separate narratives. The first, told in the style of a fairytale, is set in a traditional Greek peasant village during and after World War II. Its world is still magical. ... The second narrative is set in the present time. The narrator is a 36-year-old gay, Greek-Australian photographic artist named Isaac. We meet Isaac at a time when he has travelled to Greece for what turns out to be a rather dismal officially funded exhibition of his works.'

Source: Manne, Robert. 'Dead Disturbing'. The Monthly. (June, 2005)

Exhibitions

18388378
18387981

Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Dead Europe Louise Fox , ( dir. Tony Krawitz ) Australia : See Saw Films Porchlight Films , 2012 Z1859546 2012 single work film/TV

'Isaac, a Greek Australian in his late 20s, spirals out of control when he's forced to confront his own family's cursed legacy on his first trip to Europe - with the continent's haunted past and troubled present pressing in on him.'

Source: Inside Film website

Notes

  • Dedication: For 'Mitsos' Litras and Dimitris Tsolkas, in gratitude.
  • Epigraph: To a saintly man
    - So goes an Arab tale-
    God said somewhat maliciously:
    'Had I revealed to people
    How great a sinner you are,
    They could not praise you.'
    'And I,' answered the pious one,
    'Had I unveiled to them
    How merciful you are,
    They could not care for you.' (Czeslaw Milosz)

  • The adaptation of Dead Europe began filming in Sydney in September, 2011.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Vintage Australia , 2005 .
      image of person or book cover 5595006240086183107.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 411p.
      ISBN: 1740511948
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Atlantic Books ,
      2011 .
      image of person or book cover 4746115856433457221.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 411p.
      ISBN: 9780857891228 (pbk.), 0857891227 (pbk.)
    • North Sydney, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Random House Australia , 2011 .
      image of person or book cover 641767027896045209.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 426p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 1 March 2011.
      ISBN: 9781742743905, 1742743900
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 3797586895467896671.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 432p.
      Note/s:
      • Published March 19, 2018

      ISBN: 9780143790969
Alternative title: Ölü avrupa
Language: Turkish
    • Istanbul,
      c
      Turkey,
      c
      Middle East, Asia,
      :
      Versus Kitap ,
      2007 .
      image of person or book cover 1716843186898250831.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 400p.
      ISBN: 9789944989220

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

Charting Tsiolkas’s Literary Development through Adaptations Liz Shek-Noble , 2022 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 46 no. 1 2022; (p. 72-84)

'Christos Tsiolkas has occupied an increasingly central position in the contemporary Australian literary and cultural imagination. Starting with his novel Loaded (1995), Tsiolkas’s fiction engages with subject matter that speaks to his personal experience as both a gay man of Greek heritage and a writer concerned with larger social and political issues affecting a multicultural Australia. Examples of recurring themes in Tsiolkas’s fiction include the irreconcilability of Greek and Australian identity, racial and class intolerance, emergent sexual consciousness, and the conflict between familial obligation and individual expression. In contrast to these arguably “reader-friendly” themes—that is, themes that are accessible to a wide and non-specialist audience—Tsiolkas’s early novels (LoadedThe Jesus Man, 1999; and Dead Europe, 2005) possess a subversive edge in how they explore obscenity and social transgression. However, the publication of Tsiolkas’s fourth novel, The Slap (2008), signalled a new phase in his career, in which the formal rawness of his prose and his uncompromising representation of extreme corporeal states gave way to a simplicity in his written expression that mirrored the growing topicality of his subject matter. This change in purpose mirrors the shift in both the reception of Tsiolkas the writer and of his fiction. Prior to The Slap, Tsiolkas was viewed as a “cult figure” who, though of some critical interest, neither captivated the attention of a mainstream audience nor was celebrated by the literary establishment as an “Australian” writer whose fiction reflected purportedly national interests. However, the critical and commercial success of The Slap has ensured that both Tsiolkas and his subsequent fiction have been (re)cast as pivotal sites of commentary on contemporary Australian class and racial politics. Put another way, Tsiolkas’s “increasing visibility … as a public intellectual, if not a literary celebrity”, has resulted in changes to the form, language and subject matter of his novels, and also the ways critics receive and understand his career.' (Publication abstract)

On Harrowing in Dead Europe Daniel Hourigan , 2022 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 46 no. 1 2022; (p. 60-71)

'Dead Europe (2005) is a book about the harrowing of Isaac. The anti-Semitic logics of the novel inflect the familial curse that proceeds in the wake of Elias’s death, and the curse that haunts Isaac offers a re-emergence of a murderous anti-Semitic past. Yet this moment also confronts the critical reader with a choice: to embrace this supernatural motif of the curse or to shun it as psychopathology. Favouring the former, this article draws on the resources of Lacanian psychoanalysis and post-Marxist theory to analyse how this curse remains an exemplary trope. The argument will trace how Isaac is harrowed by the curse and, therein, ask what it means for Isaac to be harrowed. By looking again at the construction of the curse in Dead Europe, this article will examine some of the critical ideas that are uncovered by the novel’s supernaturalism.' (Publication abstract)

Grotesque Europe : The Gothic Grotesque and Anti-Semitic Stereotypes in Dead Europe Emma Doolan , 2022 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 46 no. 1 2022; (p. 45-59)

'Christos Tsiolkas’s Gothic novel Dead Europe (2005) has been criticised by some for its offensive representation of Jewish characters, and lauded by others as an unflinching interrogation of historical and contemporary anti-Semitism. The Gothic genre more broadly has a difficult history of rendering the marginalised Other as monstrous, and while contemporary writers often experiment with Gothic tropes to challenge and disrupt such representations, as a non-Jewish writer, Tsiolkas uses the figure of the monstrous Jew in problematic ways. This article analyses Dead Europe’s use of the Gothic grotesque in depicting Jewish characters, arguing that the novel engages in an ethical critique of anti-Semitic stereotypes using the grotesque’s ambivalence, overdetermination and ability to compel attention through shock and disgust.' (Publication abstract)

“I Am Not yet Satisfied” : Desire and Violence in the Works of Christos Tsiolkas and Roberto Bolaño Mark Piccini , 2022 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 46 no. 1 2022; (p. 19-30)

'From child prostitutes in Prague to wogs in suburban Melbourne, Christos Tsiolkas's fiction is full of characters defined by the desire for, discrimination against, and addiction to some form of Other. His work traces a libidinal economy that thrives where utopian ideals such as communism, cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism have failed to unify people around anything other than consumption. With particular attention to Dead Europe (2005) and Merciless Gods (2014), this article considers Tsiolkas's work alongside that of Roberto Bolaño, particularly 2666 (2004). Tsiolkas and Bolaño unearth the intersections between desire and violence across cultural, geopolitical and temporal borders. Their work offends because it implicates the subject in violence that is neither sensational nor exceptional. This violence is ongoing and without a clearly identifiable agent. Sometimes set against historical violence, such as the Holocaust, 9/11 or white Australian colonialism, it emerges in the backyard barbecues, drug-fuelled house parties and porn theatres that Tsiolkas's characters populate. This article uses Lacanian psychoanalysis to examine how Tsiolkas's work redistributes the violence from the pathological and geopolitical peripheries to the centre, disrupting Australian narratives of innocence and isolation and bringing together North and South, the Old World and the New.' (Publication abstract)

Christos Tsiolkas's Style Mark Azzopardi , 2021 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 21 no. 1 2021;

'This article takes up a specific feature of Christos Tsiolkas's writing, his style. Focusing on Tsiolkas's fourth novel, The Slap, this article argues that Tsiolkas’s style is an inarticulate style: a style that does not always use the right word at the right moment, that employs language for narrative utility rather than its own sake, and that sporadically departs from standard usage and correctness in ways that do not appear artistically motivated. My argument is that The Slap is notable among contemporary fiction in that what I consider to be Tsiolkas’s worst sentences are the most revealing of his inclinations as a novelist. Consequently, I depart from what has become a standard formula in Tsiolkas's reception, that where Tsiolkas succeeds as a writer he succeeds in spite of his style. Finally, this article also contributes to recent debates about the purpose and vocabulary of Australian literary discussion: how critics debate the work of a prize-winning author, how criticism and praise operate in critical judgements, and the significance of style in evaluations of literature.' (Publication abstract)

Unsettled By Europe's Dark Wasteland Natasha Cica , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28-29 May 2005; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas , 2005 single work novel
A Taste of European Decay Ian Syson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 May 2005; (p. 4)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas , 2005 single work novel
Dead Disturbing Robert Manne , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , June no. 2 2005; (p. 50-53)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas , 2005 single work novel
Old World Order Sally Blakeney , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 14 June vol. 123 no. 6474 2005; (p. 68-69)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas , 2005 single work novel
A Very Modern Ghost Story Michael Williams , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 272 2005; (p. 45)

— Review of Dead Europe Christos Tsiolkas , 2005 single work novel
European Vocation Sacha Molitorisz , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 June 2005; (p. 22-23)
Wrestling Demons Paul Lloyd , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 18 June 2005; (p. 11)
A Fortunate Son Richard Watts , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 3 July 2005; (p. 20)
The Year's Work in Fiction Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 50 no. 2005; (p. 56-67)
Shortlisted books for the 2004-2005 Miles Franklin Literary Award.
The Spectres Haunting Dead Europe Andrew McCann , Christen Cornell , Jeff Sparrow , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 181 2005; (p. 26-31)
Last amended 11 Jun 2020 13:29:19
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