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y separately published work icon Colonial Adventures and Experiences By a University Man single work   non-fiction   travel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1871... 1871 Colonial Adventures and Experiences By a University Man
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Affiliation Notes

  • 19th-Century Australian Travel Writing

    Colonial Adventures and Experiences was published by ‘A University Man,’ however its authorship has been attributed to Oxford graduate George Carrington (1844-1903). It is chiefly a geographical and personal description of Carrington's experience of Queensland: as he notes, this narrative was not the result of a holiday experience or travel, but an account of daily working life. Carrington ironically discusses his various attempted colonial occupations—telegraph-pole hole digger, shepherd, special correspondent, photographer’s assistant, schoolmaster, candle-maker, bark-stripper. He also discusses his observations and interactions with Aboriginal people, colonial violence, and the indentured South Sea Islander labour force. On return to Britain, Carrington worked in journalism.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Bell and Daldy , 1871 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
To the Gulfi"To the gulf, to the gulf, to Australia's fag-end,", George Carrington , single work poetry (p. 203-204)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Bell and Daldy ,
      1871 .
      image of person or book cover 4323226211577044556.png
      Link: U23355Full text document Digital copy of print publication via Text Queensland.
      Extent: vii, 291p.p.

      Holdings

      Held at: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies AIATSIS Library
      Local Id: RB C318.51/C1

      Holdings

      Held at: Australian National University Australian National University Library
      Local Id: KXL C311

      Holdings

      Held at: Adelaide University Barr Smith Library
      Local Id: 919.4 C318

      Holdings

      Held at: Monash University Monash University Library
      Local Id: 994.3 C318C

      Holdings

      Held at: National Library of Australia
      Local Id: NL 919.43 CAR

      Holdings

      Held at: Royal Geographical Society of South Australia Inc Royal Geographical Society of South Australia Library
      Local Id: rga 919.43 C316

      Holdings

      Held at: RMIT University Library Swanston Library
      Local Id: SPE 919.4043 C318

      Holdings

      Held at: Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW
      Local Id: DSM/984/C

      Holdings

      Held at: State Library of Queensland State Library of QLD
      Local Id: RBJ 919.4303 CAR

      Holdings

      Held at: State Library of South Australia State Library of SA
      Local Id: 919.43 C316

      Holdings

      Held at: University of Melbourne The University Library
      Local Id: 919.43 C318

      Holdings

      Held at: University of Queensland University of Queensland Library Fryer Library
      Local Id: DU260 .C3 1871

      Holdings

      Held at: University of Sydney The University of Sydney Library
      Local Id: RB 1571.25

Works about this Work

Performing Manliness : 'Unmanly' Men on British Frontiers in the Mid-Nineteenth Century Robert Hogg , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , September vol. 35 no. 3 2011; (p. 355-372)
'In the mid-nineteenth century, the frontiers of Queensland and British Columbia provided a stage on which British men could enact or perform manliness. Encouraged by a range of cultural productions, thousands of British men went to these colonies to act out the courage, stoicism and perseverance demanded by the cult of manliness. In so doing they hoped to achieve their manly independence. From the exploits of these men sprang the frontier myths that are so popular in modern Australian and Canadian society. However, for many men, the frontier could be a troubling and unsettling place, and for them the pursuit of manly independence could be problematic. Their stories demonstrate that manliness could be a hollow ideal, dependent on and varying according to social and physical conditions. The Queensland and British Columbia frontiers were places where 'manliness' was an important ideal but a problematic practice.' [Author's abstract]
Untitled 1871 single work column
— Appears in: The Brisbane Courier , 14 September 1871; (p. 2)
Untitled 1871 single work column
— Appears in: The Brisbane Courier , 14 September 1871; (p. 2)
Performing Manliness : 'Unmanly' Men on British Frontiers in the Mid-Nineteenth Century Robert Hogg , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , September vol. 35 no. 3 2011; (p. 355-372)
'In the mid-nineteenth century, the frontiers of Queensland and British Columbia provided a stage on which British men could enact or perform manliness. Encouraged by a range of cultural productions, thousands of British men went to these colonies to act out the courage, stoicism and perseverance demanded by the cult of manliness. In so doing they hoped to achieve their manly independence. From the exploits of these men sprang the frontier myths that are so popular in modern Australian and Canadian society. However, for many men, the frontier could be a troubling and unsettling place, and for them the pursuit of manly independence could be problematic. Their stories demonstrate that manliness could be a hollow ideal, dependent on and varying according to social and physical conditions. The Queensland and British Columbia frontiers were places where 'manliness' was an important ideal but a problematic practice.' [Author's abstract]
Last amended 6 Oct 2020 19:24:48
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