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Issue Details: First known date: 1985... 1985 The Anzac Book and the Anzac Legend : C. E. W. Bean as Editor and Image-Maker
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Writing the Anzac Legend : The Moods of Ginger Mick Philip Butterss , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 75 no. 3 2016; (p. 49-62)
'When C. J. Dennis's The Moods of Ginger Mick was launched in October 1916, one reader expressed anger about the ending. Writing facetiously on behalf of Melbourne's larrikins, this contributor to the Bulletin called it a 'rotten pome' and said - in a blunt piece of literary criticism - that he would like to punch the poet in the jaw. Actually, Dennis had thought very hard about how to finish his book, and there is no question that he found the most fitting ending, both for his own time and for later generations.' (Introduction, 49)
Multi-Panel Comic Narratives in Australian First World War Trench Publications as Citizen Journalism Jane Chapman , Ellin Daniel , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Journal of Communication , November vol. 39 no. 3 2012; (p. 1-22)
'Although textual expressions by soldiers in their own trench and troopship newspapers are relatively well known, the way that the men created and used cartoon multi-panel format is not. Humorous visual self-expression has provided a record of satirical social observation from a 'bottom up' perspective. The contribution made by illustrative narratives of the armed forces needs to be acknowledged as early citizen journalism. Comic art by servicemen - mainly from the lower ranks - has contributed to the evolution of democratic self-expression in popular culture, and manifests aspects of collective First World War experience that can be construed as a form of journalistic observation. Soldiers' universal concerns about daily life, complaints and feelings about officers, medical services, discomforts, food and drink, leave, military routines, and their expectations versus emerging reality are emphasised. In this paper, we argue that perceptions of Australian identity can also be discerned in the detailed interaction between drawings, dialogue, and/or text that is unique to this early comic-strip form.' (Author's abstract)
Multi-Panel Comic Narratives in Australian First World War Trench Publications as Citizen Journalism Jane Chapman , Ellin Daniel , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Journal of Communication , November vol. 39 no. 3 2012; (p. 1-22)
'Although textual expressions by soldiers in their own trench and troopship newspapers are relatively well known, the way that the men created and used cartoon multi-panel format is not. Humorous visual self-expression has provided a record of satirical social observation from a 'bottom up' perspective. The contribution made by illustrative narratives of the armed forces needs to be acknowledged as early citizen journalism. Comic art by servicemen - mainly from the lower ranks - has contributed to the evolution of democratic self-expression in popular culture, and manifests aspects of collective First World War experience that can be construed as a form of journalistic observation. Soldiers' universal concerns about daily life, complaints and feelings about officers, medical services, discomforts, food and drink, leave, military routines, and their expectations versus emerging reality are emphasised. In this paper, we argue that perceptions of Australian identity can also be discerned in the detailed interaction between drawings, dialogue, and/or text that is unique to this early comic-strip form.' (Author's abstract)
Writing the Anzac Legend : The Moods of Ginger Mick Philip Butterss , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 75 no. 3 2016; (p. 49-62)
'When C. J. Dennis's The Moods of Ginger Mick was launched in October 1916, one reader expressed anger about the ending. Writing facetiously on behalf of Melbourne's larrikins, this contributor to the Bulletin called it a 'rotten pome' and said - in a blunt piece of literary criticism - that he would like to punch the poet in the jaw. Actually, Dennis had thought very hard about how to finish his book, and there is no question that he found the most fitting ending, both for his own time and for later generations.' (Introduction, 49)
Last amended 7 Feb 2012 15:41:51
The Anzac Book and the Anzac Legend : C. E. W. Bean as Editor and Image-Makersmall AustLit logo Historical Studies
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