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Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 Marcus Clarke's Bohemia : Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'A Nation for a Continent' : Australian Literature and the Cartographic Imaginary of the Federation Era Robert Dixon , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 141-154, 254)
'During the Federation era, the isomorphic association of literature, land, and nation found expression through the cartographic imaginary, a term that is meant to focus especially on the role of maps in shaping imagined geographies, but which also includes related media such as topographical engravings and photographic views. Contrary to Paul Giles's implication of an achieved "national period" in American literary history, however, Dixon argues that in Australia during the Federation era, the cartographic imaginary expressed an alignment of literature, land, and nation that was more wished for than achieved. He claims that the literature of the Federation period-in particular, the sketches and stories of Henry Lawson's While the Billy Boils (1896) and Joseph Furphy's novel Such is Life (1903)–reveals the uncertainties and the sense of incompletion that attend the cartographic imaginary.' (Publication abstract)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
Cosmopolitan Convict : Marcus Clarke's Reshuffling of the Past Nicholas Birns , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lemuria , Winter vol. 1 no. 1 2006; (p. 112-121)
Birns argues for extending the appreciation of the cosmopolitan side of Marcus Clarke and his For the Term of His Natural Life. Birns in his opening claims that 'in a way [Clarke's] migration to Australia freed him to be the best nineteenth century French novelist England never had' (112).
Untitled Nicholas Birns , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 22 no. 3 2006; (p. 390-391)

— Review of Marcus Clarke's Bohemia : Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne Andrew McCann , 2004 single work criticism
Internationalising Australian Studies : Non-Fiction 2004 - 2005 Robert Dixon , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 50 no. 2005; (p. 128-143)
Argues a need for Australian literary studies and Australian studies in general to move beyond the national paradign that was a necessary part of their original disciplinary formation.
Untitled Ian Morrison , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: API Review of Books , July no. 35 2005;

— Review of Marcus Clarke's Bohemia : Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne Andrew McCann , 2004 single work criticism
Untitled Nicholas Birns , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 22 no. 3 2006; (p. 390-391)

— Review of Marcus Clarke's Bohemia : Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne Andrew McCann , 2004 single work criticism
Internationalising Australian Studies : Non-Fiction 2004 - 2005 Robert Dixon , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 50 no. 2005; (p. 128-143)
Argues a need for Australian literary studies and Australian studies in general to move beyond the national paradign that was a necessary part of their original disciplinary formation.
Cosmopolitan Convict : Marcus Clarke's Reshuffling of the Past Nicholas Birns , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lemuria , Winter vol. 1 no. 1 2006; (p. 112-121)
Birns argues for extending the appreciation of the cosmopolitan side of Marcus Clarke and his For the Term of His Natural Life. Birns in his opening claims that 'in a way [Clarke's] migration to Australia freed him to be the best nineteenth century French novelist England never had' (112).
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
'A Nation for a Continent' : Australian Literature and the Cartographic Imaginary of the Federation Era Robert Dixon , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 141-154, 254)
'During the Federation era, the isomorphic association of literature, land, and nation found expression through the cartographic imaginary, a term that is meant to focus especially on the role of maps in shaping imagined geographies, but which also includes related media such as topographical engravings and photographic views. Contrary to Paul Giles's implication of an achieved "national period" in American literary history, however, Dixon argues that in Australia during the Federation era, the cartographic imaginary expressed an alignment of literature, land, and nation that was more wished for than achieved. He claims that the literature of the Federation period-in particular, the sketches and stories of Henry Lawson's While the Billy Boils (1896) and Joseph Furphy's novel Such is Life (1903)–reveals the uncertainties and the sense of incompletion that attend the cartographic imaginary.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 1 Jun 2011 11:41:34
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