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Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 The Mystery of the Missing Middlebrow, or, The C(o)urse of Good Taste
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Imagining Australia : Literature and Culture in the New New World Judith Ryan (editor), Chris Wallace-Crabbe (editor), Cambridge : Harvard University, Committee on Australian Studies , 2004 Z1159738 2004 anthology criticism The essays in this volume emerged from a conference sponsored by the Harvard Committee on Australian Studies in late 2002. (p.xiii) Cambridge : Harvard University, Committee on Australian Studies , 2004 pg. 173-201
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Always Almost Modern : Australian Print Cultures and Modernity David Carter , Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2013 6479433 2013 multi chapter work criticism

    'Was Australian culture born modern or has it always been behind the game, never quite modern enough? Was it always already or only always almost modern? David Carter’s essays examine the complex engagements of Australian writers, artists, editors and consumers with 20th-century modernity, social and political crisis, and the impact of modernisms. Always Almost Modern ranges from the great mid-century novels of authors such as Eleanor Dark and M. Barnard Eldershaw to the unprecedented bestseller that was They’re a Weird Mob, from famous to largely forgotten local magazines and to film and television, and from the avant-garde to nationalism, communism and the middlebrow. Chapters engage with key themes in contemporary literary and cultural studies, exploring new ways of understanding Australian culture in terms of its modernity and transnationalism.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2013
    pg. 128-152

Works about this Work

Middlebrow Media and The Politics of Contemporary Fiction Andrew McCann , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , April / May no. 59 2016;
The Most Literary Yet : Man Magazine Victoria Kuttainen , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 30-36)
Sex and the City : New Novels by Women and Middlebrow Culture at Mid-Century Susan Sheridan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 1-12)
'Central to developments in Australian literature during the period from the end of Second World War until the mid-1960s - what might be called the 'long 1950s' - was the emergence of the kind of modernist novel written by Patrick White as the benchmark of modern fiction. This was the outcome of a struggle among opinion-makers in the literary field, which during this period came to be dominated for the first time by academic critics. They, by and large, favoured the new forms of postwar modernism and rejected that literary nationalism which had drawn the loyalty of most influential writers during the 1930s and 940s.' (Author's introduction)
Nation, Narration and Translation : the Construction of an Australian Literary Archive in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-13)
'The cultural capital attached to the Australian literary archive reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically 'constrained and enabled' by national literary institutions (Dixon 2005). The body of Australian texts which, through translation, is made available to the Italian readership constitutes an extension of that national archive which is shaped by another set of dynamics - both cultural and economic - that further constrain those selections. Pierre Bourdieu's theory of cultural production foregrounds the role of socio-cultural agencies in the production of texts and provides the framework for my recent research into the selection, translation and publication of Australian texts translated into Italian between 1945 and 2006. In this article I examine how in this period the selection of Australian texts for translation into Italian was 'constrained' by agencies in the target culture and also offer some insight into the manner in which Australian cultural institutions influenced that process. By foregrounding the role of socio-cultural agencies in the selection of Australian titles for translation, this article acknowledges the complexity of the relationship between translated literature as cultural artefact and as commodity, stresses the interconnectedness between texts and society, and suggests how this has contributed to shaping the archive of Australian texts in Italian.' (Author's abstract)
Nation, Narration and Translation : the Construction of an Australian Literary Archive in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-13)
'The cultural capital attached to the Australian literary archive reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically 'constrained and enabled' by national literary institutions (Dixon 2005). The body of Australian texts which, through translation, is made available to the Italian readership constitutes an extension of that national archive which is shaped by another set of dynamics - both cultural and economic - that further constrain those selections. Pierre Bourdieu's theory of cultural production foregrounds the role of socio-cultural agencies in the production of texts and provides the framework for my recent research into the selection, translation and publication of Australian texts translated into Italian between 1945 and 2006. In this article I examine how in this period the selection of Australian texts for translation into Italian was 'constrained' by agencies in the target culture and also offer some insight into the manner in which Australian cultural institutions influenced that process. By foregrounding the role of socio-cultural agencies in the selection of Australian titles for translation, this article acknowledges the complexity of the relationship between translated literature as cultural artefact and as commodity, stresses the interconnectedness between texts and society, and suggests how this has contributed to shaping the archive of Australian texts in Italian.' (Author's abstract)
Sex and the City : New Novels by Women and Middlebrow Culture at Mid-Century Susan Sheridan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 1-12)
'Central to developments in Australian literature during the period from the end of Second World War until the mid-1960s - what might be called the 'long 1950s' - was the emergence of the kind of modernist novel written by Patrick White as the benchmark of modern fiction. This was the outcome of a struggle among opinion-makers in the literary field, which during this period came to be dominated for the first time by academic critics. They, by and large, favoured the new forms of postwar modernism and rejected that literary nationalism which had drawn the loyalty of most influential writers during the 1930s and 940s.' (Author's introduction)
The Most Literary Yet : Man Magazine Victoria Kuttainen , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 30-36)
Middlebrow Media and The Politics of Contemporary Fiction Andrew McCann , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , April / May no. 59 2016;
Last amended 13 Mar 2014 11:02:16
173-201 The Mystery of the Missing Middlebrow, or, The C(o)urse of Good Tastesmall AustLit logo
128-152 The Mystery of the Missing Middlebrow, or, The C(o)urse of Good Tastesmall AustLit logo
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