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y separately published work icon The Mark of the Wagarl single work   picture book   children's   Indigenous story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 The Mark of the Wagarl
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

This is a story about the Wagarl, the sacred water snake who inhabited the waterways in the country belonging to the Nyoongar people. It tells how a little boy came to receive the Wagarl for his totem.

Exhibitions

6943772
8709801

Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Notes

  • This is a traditional tale from the Nyoongar people.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2004 .
      image of person or book cover 8985340840390029471.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 27p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Published 1 January 2004
      ISBN: 1875641971 (Hbk), 9781875641970
    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2012 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Magabala Books
      Extent: 32p.
      Edition info: New ed.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      • Also available in an electronic version via the Internet at the publisher's home page: http:/​/​www.magabala.com.
      ISBN: 9781921248412 pbk.

Works about this Work

Aboriginal Australian and Canadian First Nations Children's Literature Angeline O'Neill , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: CLCWeb : Comparative Literature and Culture , June vol. 13 no. 2 2011;
'In her article "Aboriginal Australian and Canadian First Nations Children's Literature" Angeline O'Neill discusses Canadian First Nations and Australian Aboriginal children's picture books and their appeal to a dual readership. Inuit traditional storyteller and writer Michael Kusugak, Nyoongar traditional storyteller and writer Lorna Little, and Wunambal elder Daisy Utemorrah are cases in point. Each appeals to Indigenous and non- Indigenous, child and adult readerships, thus challenging two assumptions in Western scholarship on literature that 1) the picture book genre is necessarily the domain of children and 2) that traditional Indigenous stories are, similarly, best suited to children. O'Neill considers the ways in which Indigenous children's picture books represent the interaction between text and culture and challenge notions of literariness.' (Editor's abstract)
Traditional Story of Nyoongar People 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 14 December no. 516 2011; (p. 58)

— Review of The Mark of the Wagarl Lorna Little 2004 single work picture book
Aboriginal Children's Literature : More Than Just Pretty Pictures Anita Heiss , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Just Words? : Australian Authors Writing for Justice 2008; (p. 102-117) The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 7)

'This essay explores how some recent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authored titles have used local languages and personal histories - including complex stories which deal with the Stolen Generations - to engage and educate young Australian readers, while providing much needed inspiration to nurture Indigenous audiences.' (Source: Heiss, Anita, Aboriginal Literature for Children: More Than Just Pretty Pictures, 2015)

[Review] The Mark of the Wagarl Helen Martin , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 49 no. 2 2005; (p. 19)

— Review of The Mark of the Wagarl Lorna Little 2004 single work picture book
Author Makes Her Mark at Arts Festival Desiree Bissett , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 23 March no. 347 2005; (p. 40)
The Mark of the Wagarl was launched at the Perth International Arts Festival in March 2005.
[Review] The Mark of the Wagarl Anne Hanzl , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 20 no. 1 2005; (p. 32)

— Review of The Mark of the Wagarl Lorna Little 2004 single work picture book
[Review] The Mark of the Wagarl Helen Martin , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 49 no. 2 2005; (p. 19)

— Review of The Mark of the Wagarl Lorna Little 2004 single work picture book
Traditional Story of Nyoongar People 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 14 December no. 516 2011; (p. 58)

— Review of The Mark of the Wagarl Lorna Little 2004 single work picture book
Rich Life, and Now a Book 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 12 January no. 342 2005; (p. 40)
Author Makes Her Mark at Arts Festival Desiree Bissett , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 23 March no. 347 2005; (p. 40)
The Mark of the Wagarl was launched at the Perth International Arts Festival in March 2005.
Aboriginal Australian and Canadian First Nations Children's Literature Angeline O'Neill , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: CLCWeb : Comparative Literature and Culture , June vol. 13 no. 2 2011;
'In her article "Aboriginal Australian and Canadian First Nations Children's Literature" Angeline O'Neill discusses Canadian First Nations and Australian Aboriginal children's picture books and their appeal to a dual readership. Inuit traditional storyteller and writer Michael Kusugak, Nyoongar traditional storyteller and writer Lorna Little, and Wunambal elder Daisy Utemorrah are cases in point. Each appeals to Indigenous and non- Indigenous, child and adult readerships, thus challenging two assumptions in Western scholarship on literature that 1) the picture book genre is necessarily the domain of children and 2) that traditional Indigenous stories are, similarly, best suited to children. O'Neill considers the ways in which Indigenous children's picture books represent the interaction between text and culture and challenge notions of literariness.' (Editor's abstract)
Aboriginal Children's Literature : More Than Just Pretty Pictures Anita Heiss , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Just Words? : Australian Authors Writing for Justice 2008; (p. 102-117) The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 7)

'This essay explores how some recent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authored titles have used local languages and personal histories - including complex stories which deal with the Stolen Generations - to engage and educate young Australian readers, while providing much needed inspiration to nurture Indigenous audiences.' (Source: Heiss, Anita, Aboriginal Literature for Children: More Than Just Pretty Pictures, 2015)

Last amended 7 Nov 2017 12:53:39
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