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y separately published work icon My South Sea Sweetheart single work   novel   travel   adventure  
Issue Details: First known date: 1921... 1921 My South Sea Sweetheart
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Australian Consolidated Press , 1938 .
      image of person or book cover 8563213738721357616.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Link: 9133730Full text document Sighted: 10/12/2015
      Extent: 32p.p.
      Edition info: Rev. ed.
      Note/s:
      • Some removal of material, adjustment of chapters, removal of chapter titles.
      Series: y separately published work icon Australian Women's Weekly Novel Australian Women's Weekly Supplement Australian Consolidated Press (publisher), 1934-1963 Z1224574 1934-1963 series - publisher These triple-column quarto supplements to the Australian Women's Weekly published novels by overseas and Australian writers - in the case of the latter, sometimes for the first and only time. The publication was variously described on the cover as 'The Australian Women's Weekly Novel'; 'A Complete Book-Length Novel'; 'A Free Supplement to the Australian Women's Weekly' and 'Supplement - Must Not Be Sold Separately'. Number in series: 106

Works about this Work

'How White She Was!' : Race, Gender and Global Capital in the Life and Times of Beatrice Grimshaw Julie Evans , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Collisions of Cultures and Identities : Settlers and Indigenous Peoples 2007; (p. 187-201)
Julie Evans reads Grimshaws early 20th century novels, set in Papua New Guinea, Polynesia and Melanesia, to 'demonstrate how race and gender were deeply imbricated in the production of the very social inequalities upon which empire depended' (187). She concludes that the wide readership of Grimshaw's fiction is an indicator of 'the extent to which prevailing constructions of the absolute primitiveness of the region's inhabitants ... served both British and Australian interests' (197).
'How White She Was!' : Race, Gender and Global Capital in the Life and Times of Beatrice Grimshaw Julie Evans , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Collisions of Cultures and Identities : Settlers and Indigenous Peoples 2007; (p. 187-201)
Julie Evans reads Grimshaws early 20th century novels, set in Papua New Guinea, Polynesia and Melanesia, to 'demonstrate how race and gender were deeply imbricated in the production of the very social inequalities upon which empire depended' (187). She concludes that the wide readership of Grimshaw's fiction is an indicator of 'the extent to which prevailing constructions of the absolute primitiveness of the region's inhabitants ... served both British and Australian interests' (197).
Last amended 30 Jun 2017 09:23:32
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