AustLit logo
y separately published work icon Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood single work   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Notes

  • Dedication: In memoriam Ian Stocks (1942-2002) whose idea it was, and in loving memory of Philippa Noyce (who started it all).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Hybridity, Power Discourse and Evolving Representations of Aboriginality (1970s - Today) Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 29-34)
'This essay examines the changing role played by the politicized concept of hybridity in filmic representations of Aboriginal identity over the past four decades...' (29)
Samson & Delilah : Herstory, Trauma and Survival Susan Ryan-Fazileau , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The historical trauma of the Aborigines and white Australian nation-building are not simply contemporaneous - the latter is part of what made the former possible. The subject of black-on-black violence within Aboriginal communities has been a hot issue in Australia for the past few years, more specifically that perpetrated by Indigenous men against Indigenous women and children. The situation of many Aborigines today demonstrates a paradoxical relation between destruction and survival, the incomprehensibility at the heart of traumatic experience. Aboriginal film-maker Warwick Thornton's 2009 movie, "Samson & Delilah", tells the story of two teenagers caught up in this situation. Trauma theory, which focuses on the destructive repetition of violence is used as a tool for the analysis of this film, repetition being a structural principle in the narrative. For example, after repeating the same self-defeating ritual every day, Samson sniffs petrol to escape from the desolation and neglect, in the throes of what appears to be a post-traumatic death drive. Delilah's life is equally repetitive but less desolate until her grandmother's death plunges her into a cycle of violence and horror that also leads to petrol-sniffing and near death. But, in Thornton's fictional world, the women are the Samsons. Delilah defends herself and her intended against both white and black violence and, through 'herstory', the film-maker passes on not only the story of a crisis but that of a survival.' (Author's abstract)
Quotation Marks Around the Big Subject Brian McFarlane , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 273 2005; (p. 46-47)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
Real Noyce in His Own Words Evan Williams , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30-31 October 2004; (p. 15)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
Big Budgets, Small Ironies Peter Galvin , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 16-17 October 2004; (p. 11)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
Zoom in to Close-Up Des Partridge , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 25 September 2004; (p. 7)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
Close-Up Blurs the Image Tom Ryan , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 9 October 2004; (p. 4)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
Books Phil Brown , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 13 - 19 October no. 512 2004; (p. 34)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography ; Are We There Yet? Chasing a Childhood Through South Africa David Smiedt , 2004 single work autobiography
Big Budgets, Small Ironies Peter Galvin , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 16-17 October 2004; (p. 11)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
Real Noyce in His Own Words Evan Williams , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30-31 October 2004; (p. 15)

— Review of Phillip Noyce : Backroads to Hollywood Ingo Petzke , 2004 single work biography
The Sunset Clause Rodney Dalton , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 25-26 September 2004; (p. 4-5)
Shoestring Cinema Has Been Given the Boot Des Partridge , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 2 October 2004; (p. 20)
Samson & Delilah : Herstory, Trauma and Survival Susan Ryan-Fazileau , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The historical trauma of the Aborigines and white Australian nation-building are not simply contemporaneous - the latter is part of what made the former possible. The subject of black-on-black violence within Aboriginal communities has been a hot issue in Australia for the past few years, more specifically that perpetrated by Indigenous men against Indigenous women and children. The situation of many Aborigines today demonstrates a paradoxical relation between destruction and survival, the incomprehensibility at the heart of traumatic experience. Aboriginal film-maker Warwick Thornton's 2009 movie, "Samson & Delilah", tells the story of two teenagers caught up in this situation. Trauma theory, which focuses on the destructive repetition of violence is used as a tool for the analysis of this film, repetition being a structural principle in the narrative. For example, after repeating the same self-defeating ritual every day, Samson sniffs petrol to escape from the desolation and neglect, in the throes of what appears to be a post-traumatic death drive. Delilah's life is equally repetitive but less desolate until her grandmother's death plunges her into a cycle of violence and horror that also leads to petrol-sniffing and near death. But, in Thornton's fictional world, the women are the Samsons. Delilah defends herself and her intended against both white and black violence and, through 'herstory', the film-maker passes on not only the story of a crisis but that of a survival.' (Author's abstract)
Hybridity, Power Discourse and Evolving Representations of Aboriginality (1970s - Today) Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 29-34)
'This essay examines the changing role played by the politicized concept of hybridity in filmic representations of Aboriginal identity over the past four decades...' (29)
Last amended 16 Mar 2012 11:14:24
Subjects:
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X