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y separately published work icon Post Me to the Prime Minister selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 Post Me to the Prime Minister
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This first-ever comprehensive collection of the forward-looking poems of Romaine Moreton includes reflections on origins, dispossession, dislocation and identity, on mudcrabs, love and petrol-sniffing.' (Source: Goodreads website)

Exhibitions

8714578
12914044

Contents

* Contents derived from the Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,:Jukurrpa Books , 2004 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Words Like Wateri"Your words like water", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 1)
Capturedi"I once saw a man arrested", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 2-4)
Mud Crabi"your arms bound tight", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 5-7)
Objectify My Sexi"Because I place", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 8-9)
A Dedicationi"It does not matter to me whether G-d", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 10)
The Moon Brings Bloodi"my mother", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 11-15)
Road Tolli"on the road to Canberra", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 16)
Seasonal Revelationsi"great trees do not grow overnight", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 17)
The Lamb Lay Downi"next to mother", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 18-19)
To the Suni"my brother my sister", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 20-23)
Crimes of Existencei"my mother thinks", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 24-25)
That's My People : I'm Imperfecti"western society does decree", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 26-28)
Are You Beautiful Todayi"are you beautiful today?", Romaine Moreton , 2001 single work poetry (p. 29-36)
Edeni"it is as clear as the air in Eden", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 37-41)
Strange Recipei"half-caste", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 42-43)
In My Countryi"in my own country", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 44-46)
Jimi Hendrix and Ochrei"jimi hendrix splashed in ochre", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 47)
Danglei"I saw a small bird dangling", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 48-49)
Tin Can Ii"petrol inhaled melts the body fat", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 50)
Tin Can IIi"at the bottom of my tin can", Romaine Moreton , 2004 single work poetry (p. 51)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,: Jukurrpa Books , 2004 .
      image of person or book cover 666335216972099480.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 138p.
      Note/s:
      • Audio CD contains Romaine performing her poetry.
      ISBN: 1864650613

Works about this Work

Cultural Heritage and Identity in the Literature of Australian South Sea Islanders and Other Media 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , vol. 12 no. 1 2013;

'Australian South Sea Islanders represent a small community whose ancestors mainly came from Melanesian Islands to work as indentured labour in the sugar cane plantations of Queensland from the 1860’s to the beginning of the 20th century. Many still live near the old sugar towns, but apart from an official recognition of their existence and distinctiveness by the Federal Government in 1994 and by the Queensland Government in 2000, South Sea Islanders’ culture, economic and political roles are still underrepresented or even ignored in Australia. In the 1970’s, writers belonging to that community, such as Faith Bandler, Mabel Edmund and Noel Fatnowna started to tell their own family history since the arrival of their first ancestors on the continent. These autobiographical accounts enabled them to reassert their identity as a culturally distinct group and to shed light on a part of Australia’s forgotten past. Other written testimonies followed at the beginning of the 21st century but the lack of young South Sea Islander writers induced us to look at their other means of expression to promote their culture and complete the missing parts of their personal and collective history. ' (Author's abstract)

"Once Upon a Patriachy" : Cultural Translation in the Poetry of Romaine Moreton Katherine Russo , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Partnership Id-Entities : Cultural and Literary Re-Insciption/s of the Feminine 2010; (p. 31-44)
Generating Alternative Worlds : The Indigenous Protest Poetry of Romaine Moreton Danica Cerce , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: ELOPE , Spring vol. 7 no. 1 2010; (p. 49-59)
'Since the 1980s, indigenous authors have had a high profile in Australia and their writing has made a significant impact on the Australian public. Given that poetry has attracted more indigenous Australians than any other mode of creative expression, this genre, too, has provided an important impetus for their cultural and political expression. Discussing the verse of Romaine Moreton, and taking up George Levine’s view (2000) that works of art are able to produce critical disruptions and generate alternative worlds, the article aims to show that Moreton’s mesmerising reflections on origin, dispossession, dislocation and identity of Australian indigenous peoples encouraged national self-reflection and helped create a meaningful existence for the deprived and the dispossessed. It also touches upon some other topics explored in Moreton’s poetry and provides evidence of its universal relevance.' (Publication abstract)
'Post Me to the Prime Minister': Property, Language, and Indigenous/Non-Indigenous Relations in the Australian Nation Katherine Russo , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Anglistica , vol. 9 no. 2 2005; (p. 103-125)
'The power of the English language in shaping ideas of Australian national culture and citizenship has been pervasive. Consequently, the "use" of the English language has been variously questioned by Indigenous Australian peoples. The codification of the "correct" and "appropriate" use of the English language has naturalised and legitimised colonial claims of exclusive "property" over the language defining the boundaries set to exclude/include peoples in Australia's "imagined community". However, the neo/colonial "possessive investment" in the representation of English as a non-Indigenous property is disrupted by the process of "appropriation", through which writers such as Romaine Moreton diversely disrupt neo/colonial claims of property, opening up endless possibilities for the roles English language users can play, and for how the importance of this use is viewed by others.' -- from the journal's website at http://www.anglistica.unior.it/content/%E2%80%9Cpost-me-prime-minister%E2%80%9D-property-language-and-indigenousnon-indigenous-relations-australian
Untitled B. M. , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Winter vol. 13 no. 2 2005; (p. 48-49)

— Review of Post Me to the Prime Minister Romaine Moreton , 2004 selected work poetry
Untitled B. M. , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Winter vol. 13 no. 2 2005; (p. 48-49)

— Review of Post Me to the Prime Minister Romaine Moreton , 2004 selected work poetry
'Post Me to the Prime Minister': Property, Language, and Indigenous/Non-Indigenous Relations in the Australian Nation Katherine Russo , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Anglistica , vol. 9 no. 2 2005; (p. 103-125)
'The power of the English language in shaping ideas of Australian national culture and citizenship has been pervasive. Consequently, the "use" of the English language has been variously questioned by Indigenous Australian peoples. The codification of the "correct" and "appropriate" use of the English language has naturalised and legitimised colonial claims of exclusive "property" over the language defining the boundaries set to exclude/include peoples in Australia's "imagined community". However, the neo/colonial "possessive investment" in the representation of English as a non-Indigenous property is disrupted by the process of "appropriation", through which writers such as Romaine Moreton diversely disrupt neo/colonial claims of property, opening up endless possibilities for the roles English language users can play, and for how the importance of this use is viewed by others.' -- from the journal's website at http://www.anglistica.unior.it/content/%E2%80%9Cpost-me-prime-minister%E2%80%9D-property-language-and-indigenousnon-indigenous-relations-australian
"Once Upon a Patriachy" : Cultural Translation in the Poetry of Romaine Moreton Katherine Russo , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Partnership Id-Entities : Cultural and Literary Re-Insciption/s of the Feminine 2010; (p. 31-44)
Cultural Heritage and Identity in the Literature of Australian South Sea Islanders and Other Media 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , vol. 12 no. 1 2013;

'Australian South Sea Islanders represent a small community whose ancestors mainly came from Melanesian Islands to work as indentured labour in the sugar cane plantations of Queensland from the 1860’s to the beginning of the 20th century. Many still live near the old sugar towns, but apart from an official recognition of their existence and distinctiveness by the Federal Government in 1994 and by the Queensland Government in 2000, South Sea Islanders’ culture, economic and political roles are still underrepresented or even ignored in Australia. In the 1970’s, writers belonging to that community, such as Faith Bandler, Mabel Edmund and Noel Fatnowna started to tell their own family history since the arrival of their first ancestors on the continent. These autobiographical accounts enabled them to reassert their identity as a culturally distinct group and to shed light on a part of Australia’s forgotten past. Other written testimonies followed at the beginning of the 21st century but the lack of young South Sea Islander writers induced us to look at their other means of expression to promote their culture and complete the missing parts of their personal and collective history. ' (Author's abstract)

Generating Alternative Worlds : The Indigenous Protest Poetry of Romaine Moreton Danica Cerce , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: ELOPE , Spring vol. 7 no. 1 2010; (p. 49-59)
'Since the 1980s, indigenous authors have had a high profile in Australia and their writing has made a significant impact on the Australian public. Given that poetry has attracted more indigenous Australians than any other mode of creative expression, this genre, too, has provided an important impetus for their cultural and political expression. Discussing the verse of Romaine Moreton, and taking up George Levine’s view (2000) that works of art are able to produce critical disruptions and generate alternative worlds, the article aims to show that Moreton’s mesmerising reflections on origin, dispossession, dislocation and identity of Australian indigenous peoples encouraged national self-reflection and helped create a meaningful existence for the deprived and the dispossessed. It also touches upon some other topics explored in Moreton’s poetry and provides evidence of its universal relevance.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 15 Jun 2015 15:38:19
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