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y separately published work icon The Tempestuous Voyage of Hopewell Shakespeare single work   novel   young adult   historical fiction   adventure  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 The Tempestuous Voyage of Hopewell Shakespeare
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Hopewell Shakespeare is a young apprentice in London. He is besotted with the Globe where the plays of his distant cousin, William, fuel his fantasies of love and fortune. He joins the crew of a pirate, Captain Wolfe, on The Golden Dragon, searching for the legendary Lost Island ruled by the Lord of Alchemists. But Hopewell is suspicious of the second mate Davy Jones and the ship's boy Kit Sly, and beset by visions of a beautiful woman and predictions of a White Ship. When the Golden Dragon pursues and is wrecked by such a ship, Hopewell seems to be sole survivor, cast up on an island inhabited only by an elderly scholar, Dr Prosper Bonaventure, a girl, Flora, and her goat, Caprice. But who from the wreck is truly lost, and who has survived? What is real and what is illusion? Who is evil and who is good? Which is the Lord of Alchemists who manipulates them all? As Hopewell struggles through the twists of an enchanted world, the scales begin to fall from his eyes . . .' Source: bookseller's website.

Exhibitions

13021310

Notes

  • Prequel to The Madman of Venice.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon Shakespeare in Children's Literature : Gender and Cultural Capital Erica Hateley , New York (City) : Routledge , 2009 13815357 2009 single work criticism

'Shakespeare in Children's Literature looks at the genre of Shakespeare-for-children, considering both adaptations of his plays and children's novels in which he appears as a character. Drawing on feminist theory and sociology, Hateley demonstrates how Shakespeare for children utilises the ongoing cultural capital of "Shakespeare," and the pedagogical aspects of children's literature, to perpetuate anachronistic forms of identity and authority.' (Source: Publisher's blurb)

A Local Habitation and a Name : Writing Shakespearean Novels Sophie Masson , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 19 no. 3 2004; (p. 12-15)
Untitled Shirley Broadhurst , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 18 no. 1 2004; (p. 35)

— Review of The Tempestuous Voyage of Hopewell Shakespeare Sophie Masson , 2003 single work novel
Untitled Moira Robinson , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 19 no. 1 2004; (p. 42)

— Review of The Tempestuous Voyage of Hopewell Shakespeare Sophie Masson , 2003 single work novel
Untitled Moira Robinson , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 19 no. 1 2004; (p. 42)

— Review of The Tempestuous Voyage of Hopewell Shakespeare Sophie Masson , 2003 single work novel
Untitled Shirley Broadhurst , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 18 no. 1 2004; (p. 35)

— Review of The Tempestuous Voyage of Hopewell Shakespeare Sophie Masson , 2003 single work novel
A Local Habitation and a Name : Writing Shakespearean Novels Sophie Masson , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 19 no. 3 2004; (p. 12-15)
y separately published work icon Shakespeare in Children's Literature : Gender and Cultural Capital Erica Hateley , New York (City) : Routledge , 2009 13815357 2009 single work criticism

'Shakespeare in Children's Literature looks at the genre of Shakespeare-for-children, considering both adaptations of his plays and children's novels in which he appears as a character. Drawing on feminist theory and sociology, Hateley demonstrates how Shakespeare for children utilises the ongoing cultural capital of "Shakespeare," and the pedagogical aspects of children's literature, to perpetuate anachronistic forms of identity and authority.' (Source: Publisher's blurb)

Last amended 7 Mar 2018 09:32:04
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