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y separately published work icon The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard single work   picture book   children's   adventure   historical fiction  
Is part of Boy Bear Gregory Rogers , 2004 series - author picture book (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A boy playing among the warehouses of London kicks a soccer ball into an abandoned theater. There he finds an enchanted cape that transports him back in time right onto the stage of one of William Shakespeare's plays! A comic romp through Shakespeare's London featuring an intrepid little boy, a friendly bear, and-in the role of dastardly villain-the Bard himself. What happens when a boy bursts through the curtain of a deserted theatre and onto the world's most famous stage? He lands on the Bard himself and the chase is on-through the streets of Shakespeare's London. This is a rare and inventive visual feast-a runaway story about a curious boy, a magic cloak, a grumpy bard, a captive bear and a baron bound for the chopping block.' Source: Libraries Australia (Sighted 13/10/2010).

Exhibitions

13020458

Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Notes

  • A wordless picture book.
  • Named one of the New York Times 10 best illustrated books of 2004.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2004 .
      image of person or book cover 4020637735853296835.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 32p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 186508722X
    • Brookfield, Connecticut,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Roaring Brook Press ,
      2004 .
      Extent: 32p.
      Edition info: 1st American edition.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      • A Neal Porter book.
      • A Junior Library Guild selection.
      ISBN: 9781596430099 (hbk.)
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2008 .
      Extent: 30p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 9781741145359 (pbk.)
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2015 .
      image of person or book cover 6787373183880272223.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 104p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Published September 2015
      ISBN: 9781760112394

Works about this Work

In Search of the Great Australian (Graphic) Novel Kevin Patrick , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , 16 February vol. 1 no. 1 2012; (p. 51-66)
'The critical acclaim enjoyed by such recent Australian graphic novels as Shaun Tan's The Arrival (2006) and Nicki Greenberg's adaptation of The Great Gatsby (2007) suggested that Australia had finally 'caught up' with the United States and Britain, by embracing the graphic novel as a legitimate creative medium, on a par with literature and cinema. The media interest generated by a succession of Australian graphic novels during recent years often implied that their very existence was a relatively new phenomenon. Accepting this premise without question, however, overlooks the evolution of the graphic novel in Australia, early examples of which - such as Syd Nicholls' Middy Malone: A Book Pirates (1941) - date back to the 1940s. Documenting how historical changes in the production and dissemination of graphic novels in Australia have influenced their critical and popular reception therefore creates new opportunities to explore a largely overlooked facet of Australian print culture. Furthermore, the study of the graphic novel in an exclusively Australian context provides a new perspective for re-examining the origins, definitions and, indeed, the limitations of the term 'graphic novel', and extends the parameters of the academic literature devoted to the medium beyond the traditionally dominant Anglo-American focus.' (Author's abstract)
Shakespeare Is Child's Play! : Picture Books As Theatre In Primary Classrooms Erica Hateley , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Practically Primary , June vol. 16 no. 2 2011; (p. 36-41)
De-Colonising Shakespeare? Agency and (Masculine) Authority in Gregory Rogers's The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard Erica Hateley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , vol. 19 no. 1 2009; (p. 59-68)
'Although Said is writing about literal geographies here as well as cultural mappings of them, I open with his claims in order to initiate my consideration of the ways in which 'Shakespeare' as a discourse (Freedman 1989, p.245) and Shakespeare's historical and geographical contexts have been made over into culturally-contested terrain within contemporary children's literature for the purposes of constructing and controlling social space and subjectivities.
Historically, both the discourse of 'Shakespeare' and the depiction of William Shakespeare as a character have been deployed as structuring logics for narratives about the inherent value of Shakespeare, and in turn, for discussions of not just the legitimacy but the necessity of young people's subordination of self to Shakespeare. Gregory Rogers's The Boy, The Bear, The Baron, The Bard (2004) not only participates in that tradition of children's literature which deploys Shakespeare as a colonising discourse but also disrupts the norms of the tradition in two important ways' (Author's abstract).
Books Children's Jane Barry , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 23 - 24 February 2008; (p. 25)

— Review of The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book
Untitled Jean Yates , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Books from Our Backyard : Must-Read Books from Queensland 2006; (p. 57)

— Review of The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book
Flights of Fantasy Gail MacCallum , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 May vol. 122 no. 6422 2004; (p. 66-67)

— Review of Yardil Rosanne Hawke , 2004 single work picture book ; Reggie and Lu (and the Same to You!) Emma Quay , 2004 single work picture book ; Ichabod Hart and the Lighthouse Mystery James Roy , 2003 single work children's fiction ; The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book
Untitled Eliza Metcalfe , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , April vol. 83 no. 9 2004; (p. 46)

— Review of The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book
Power in Pictures Debra Aldred , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 3 July 2004; (p. 6)

— Review of The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book
Bookshelf Katharine England , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 4 September 2004; (p. 11)

— Review of Caruso's Song to the Moon Adele Jaunn , 2004 single work picture book ; The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book ; Yardil Rosanne Hawke , 2004 single work picture book
Pleasure First Stella Lees , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January no. 267 2004-2005; (p. 69-70)

— Review of There Once Was a Boy Called Tashi Anna Fienberg , Barbara Fienberg , 2004 single work picture book ; The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard 2004 single work picture book ; The Great Montefiasco Colin Thompson , 2004 single work picture book
The Genesis and Genius of Gregory Rogers' The Boy the Bear the Baron the Bard Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 19 no. 2 2004; (p. 4-6)
Drawn to Book Art Jennifer Moran , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 4 October 2005; (p. 15)
De-Colonising Shakespeare? Agency and (Masculine) Authority in Gregory Rogers's The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard Erica Hateley , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , vol. 19 no. 1 2009; (p. 59-68)
'Although Said is writing about literal geographies here as well as cultural mappings of them, I open with his claims in order to initiate my consideration of the ways in which 'Shakespeare' as a discourse (Freedman 1989, p.245) and Shakespeare's historical and geographical contexts have been made over into culturally-contested terrain within contemporary children's literature for the purposes of constructing and controlling social space and subjectivities.
Historically, both the discourse of 'Shakespeare' and the depiction of William Shakespeare as a character have been deployed as structuring logics for narratives about the inherent value of Shakespeare, and in turn, for discussions of not just the legitimacy but the necessity of young people's subordination of self to Shakespeare. Gregory Rogers's The Boy, The Bear, The Baron, The Bard (2004) not only participates in that tradition of children's literature which deploys Shakespeare as a colonising discourse but also disrupts the norms of the tradition in two important ways' (Author's abstract).
Shakespeare Is Child's Play! : Picture Books As Theatre In Primary Classrooms Erica Hateley , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Practically Primary , June vol. 16 no. 2 2011; (p. 36-41)
In Search of the Great Australian (Graphic) Novel Kevin Patrick , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , 16 February vol. 1 no. 1 2012; (p. 51-66)
'The critical acclaim enjoyed by such recent Australian graphic novels as Shaun Tan's The Arrival (2006) and Nicki Greenberg's adaptation of The Great Gatsby (2007) suggested that Australia had finally 'caught up' with the United States and Britain, by embracing the graphic novel as a legitimate creative medium, on a par with literature and cinema. The media interest generated by a succession of Australian graphic novels during recent years often implied that their very existence was a relatively new phenomenon. Accepting this premise without question, however, overlooks the evolution of the graphic novel in Australia, early examples of which - such as Syd Nicholls' Middy Malone: A Book Pirates (1941) - date back to the 1940s. Documenting how historical changes in the production and dissemination of graphic novels in Australia have influenced their critical and popular reception therefore creates new opportunities to explore a largely overlooked facet of Australian print culture. Furthermore, the study of the graphic novel in an exclusively Australian context provides a new perspective for re-examining the origins, definitions and, indeed, the limitations of the term 'graphic novel', and extends the parameters of the academic literature devoted to the medium beyond the traditionally dominant Anglo-American focus.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 28 Aug 2017 13:51:31
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