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Sybilline single work   poetry   "That rabbit's foot I carried in my left pocket"
  • Author:agent 'Ern Malley' http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/mcauley-james
Issue Details: First known date: 1944... 1944 Sybilline
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Notes

  • Includes imagery related to the interpretation of dreams and premonitions.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Orphic Strain in Australian Poetry Andrew Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refashioning Myth : Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses 2011; (p. 9-27)
'Andrew Johnson argues that "[w]hile poetry in Australia might broadly be read under the aegis of Romanticism, the various Orphic poems could be used as an index of different styles and schools," and claims that "the different approaches and interests of various poets could be measured by their varied responses to the Orphic material." Johnson applies this framework to a close reading of several key Australian poets, including A. D. Hope and the notorious "mythical" poet, Ern Malley.' (Source: Introduction p. 2)
The Orphic Strain in Australian Poetry Andrew Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refashioning Myth : Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses 2011; (p. 9-27)
'Andrew Johnson argues that "[w]hile poetry in Australia might broadly be read under the aegis of Romanticism, the various Orphic poems could be used as an index of different styles and schools," and claims that "the different approaches and interests of various poets could be measured by their varied responses to the Orphic material." Johnson applies this framework to a close reading of several key Australian poets, including A. D. Hope and the notorious "mythical" poet, Ern Malley.' (Source: Introduction p. 2)
Last amended 30 Jul 2003 17:13:25
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