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y separately published work icon When the Red Gods Call single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1911... 1911 When the Red Gods Call
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Wenn die roten Götter rufen: Kolonialroman

Works about this Work

Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
'How White She Was!' : Race, Gender and Global Capital in the Life and Times of Beatrice Grimshaw Julie Evans , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Collisions of Cultures and Identities : Settlers and Indigenous Peoples 2007; (p. 187-201)
Julie Evans reads Grimshaws early 20th century novels, set in Papua New Guinea, Polynesia and Melanesia, to 'demonstrate how race and gender were deeply imbricated in the production of the very social inequalities upon which empire depended' (187). She concludes that the wide readership of Grimshaw's fiction is an indicator of 'the extent to which prevailing constructions of the absolute primitiveness of the region's inhabitants ... served both British and Australian interests' (197).
'How White She Was!' : Race, Gender and Global Capital in the Life and Times of Beatrice Grimshaw Julie Evans , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Collisions of Cultures and Identities : Settlers and Indigenous Peoples 2007; (p. 187-201)
Julie Evans reads Grimshaws early 20th century novels, set in Papua New Guinea, Polynesia and Melanesia, to 'demonstrate how race and gender were deeply imbricated in the production of the very social inequalities upon which empire depended' (187). She concludes that the wide readership of Grimshaw's fiction is an indicator of 'the extent to which prevailing constructions of the absolute primitiveness of the region's inhabitants ... served both British and Australian interests' (197).
Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Last amended 30 Jun 2017 09:35:03
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    Papua New Guinea,
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    Pacific Region,
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