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Issue Details: First known date: 1930-1956... 1930-1956 The Central Queensland Herald
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The Central Queensland Herald published poetry and short stories and included regular pages of literary interest - 'Our Freelance Page' and 'Book Club' - as well as pages such as 'Nature Students.' Both L. A. Sigsworth and Mary House were regular contributors.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

‘Uncle Sam’s Letterbag’ : Children’s Involvement in Newspaper Propaganda in the First World War Margaret Cook , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , September vol. 8 no. 2 2019; (p. 211-228)

'This paper draws on letters published weekly in ‘Uncle Sam’s Corner’, in Rockhampton’s Morning Bulletin and Central Queensland Herald between 1915 and 1918 to explore the role of journalists in disseminating popular narratives during the First World War. Through the children’s own words their understanding of unfolding events is exposed as is the role of journalist ‘Uncle Sam’ in shaping children’s wartime responses. Using his adjoining children’s corner and the responses given to the children’s letters, Uncle Sam inculcates the values of duty, service and sacrifice; the qualities demanded of the Empire’s civilians in wartime to aid military success. An examination of a specific children’s column reveals how media can overtly manipulate public perceptions to shape dominant societal narratives and highlights how children unwittingly participate in wartime propaganda.'  (Publication abstract)

‘Uncle Sam’s Letterbag’ : Children’s Involvement in Newspaper Propaganda in the First World War Margaret Cook , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , September vol. 8 no. 2 2019; (p. 211-228)

'This paper draws on letters published weekly in ‘Uncle Sam’s Corner’, in Rockhampton’s Morning Bulletin and Central Queensland Herald between 1915 and 1918 to explore the role of journalists in disseminating popular narratives during the First World War. Through the children’s own words their understanding of unfolding events is exposed as is the role of journalist ‘Uncle Sam’ in shaping children’s wartime responses. Using his adjoining children’s corner and the responses given to the children’s letters, Uncle Sam inculcates the values of duty, service and sacrifice; the qualities demanded of the Empire’s civilians in wartime to aid military success. An examination of a specific children’s column reveals how media can overtly manipulate public perceptions to shape dominant societal narratives and highlights how children unwittingly participate in wartime propaganda.'  (Publication abstract)

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

Frequency:
Weekly
Range:
2 Jan 1930 - 29 Nov 1956
Continues:
Artesian and The Capricornian
Mergers:
Formed by a merger of Artesian and The Capricornian

Has serialised

Broadcasting the Tea Race, Junius , single work novel
Fictionalised account of 'the great tea race of 1866'.
Last amended 21 May 2008 11:47:38
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