Migratory single work   poetry   "I am the nest that comes and goes,"
Is part of Presence : Translations from the Natural World Les Murray 1992 sequence poetry
  • Author: Les Murray http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/murray-les
Issue Details: First known date: 1991... 1991 Migratory
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Adelaide Review no. 86 March 1991 Z606719 1991 periodical issue 1991 pg. 24
  • Appears in:
    y Translations from the Natural World Les Murray , Paddington : Isabella Press , 1992 Z208589 1992 selected work poetry Translations from the Natural World, Les Murray's new collection of poems, is, like all his work, rich in inventiveness, perception, and a rare delight in the mimetic powers of language. Its centerpiece is 'Presence', a sequence of forty 'translations from the natural world' about a variety of natural settings and their amazing denizens. Lyre birds, honeycombs, sea lions, cuttlefish, and possums all act as spurs to Murray's protean talents for description and imitation. As Lachlan MacKinnon wrote in The Times Literary Supplement, 'These poems, a grand tour of the given, are a great hymn to the particularities in which God's creative generosity is expressed, and they will be widely enjoyed and admired. Their technical and linguistic largesse confirms . . . that Les Murray is one of the very finest poets in whom the English language is now at work.' (Libraries Australia) Paddington : Isabella Press , 1992 pg. 52
  • Appears in:
    y The Sydney Review no. 45 August 1992 Z606721 1992 newspaper issue 1992 pg. 12
  • Appears in:
    y Collected Poems Les Murray , Port Melbourne : Heinemann Australia , 1994 Z422024 1994 selected work poetry Port Melbourne : Heinemann Australia , 1994 pg. 395
  • Appears in:
    y New Selected Poems Les Murray , Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 1998 Z918005 1998 selected work poetry Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 1998 pg. 151
  • Appears in:
    y New Selected Poems Les Murray , Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 1998 Z918005 1998 selected work poetry New York (City) : Farrar Straus and Giroux , 2000 pg. 156
  • Appears in:
    y Learning Human : Selected Poems of Les Murray Les Murray , Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 2003 Z1147830 2003 selected work poetry Potts Point : Duffy and Snellgrove , 2003 pg. 115
Alternative title: Zugvogel
First line of verse: "Ich bin das Nest, das kommt und geht,"
Language: German

Works about this Work

A Climate of Hope Bill Ashcroft , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November vol. 17 no. 2017; (p. 19-34)

Postcolonial ecocriticism has emerged gradually over the last couple of decades as the differences between postcolonialism and environmentalism have been overcome. Those differences have centred on an assumed conflict in the way the two discourses see the world. However, the colonial roots of environmental degradation and the growing postcolonial critique of the effects of imperialism have seen a growing alliance focused in the discipline of postcolonial ecocriticism. Postcolonial critique and environmentalism have found common interest in the role of imperialism and capitalism in the rapidly degrading anthropocene. However critique has not often led to a clear vision of a possible world. This paper suggests a new alliance – between postcolonial critique, environmentalism and utopianism – one that emerges from the postcolonial realisation the no transformation can occur without the hope inspired by a vision of the future. The paper asks what literature can do in an environmental struggle in which colonized peoples environmental struggle in which colonized peoples are among the worst affected. The role of postcolonial literature provides a model for the transformative function of the creative spirit in political resistance. No true resistance can succeed without a vision of change and literature provides the most powerful location of that vision – no transformation can occur unless it is first imagined.

A Climate of Hope Bill Ashcroft , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November vol. 17 no. 2017; (p. 19-34)

Postcolonial ecocriticism has emerged gradually over the last couple of decades as the differences between postcolonialism and environmentalism have been overcome. Those differences have centred on an assumed conflict in the way the two discourses see the world. However, the colonial roots of environmental degradation and the growing postcolonial critique of the effects of imperialism have seen a growing alliance focused in the discipline of postcolonial ecocriticism. Postcolonial critique and environmentalism have found common interest in the role of imperialism and capitalism in the rapidly degrading anthropocene. However critique has not often led to a clear vision of a possible world. This paper suggests a new alliance – between postcolonial critique, environmentalism and utopianism – one that emerges from the postcolonial realisation the no transformation can occur without the hope inspired by a vision of the future. The paper asks what literature can do in an environmental struggle in which colonized peoples environmental struggle in which colonized peoples are among the worst affected. The role of postcolonial literature provides a model for the transformative function of the creative spirit in political resistance. No true resistance can succeed without a vision of change and literature provides the most powerful location of that vision – no transformation can occur unless it is first imagined.

Last amended 19 Oct 2004 16:46:55
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