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y separately published work icon At Home in Australia single work   prose  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 At Home in Australia
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A photo essay accompanied by 205 photographs selected from the collection of the National Gallery of Australia.

Notes

  • Book launched at the National Gallery of Australia on 10 October 2003.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Fence in Australian Short Fiction : 'A Constant Crossing of Boundaries'? Kieran Dolin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 141-153)
'This article contributes to discussions about the significance of fences in the Australian social imaginary. It undertakes a historical and intertextual reading of eight short stories that take the fence as their titular symbol, and explores how the fence story is rewritten at various moments of change in twentieth-century Australia. Developments in narrative form and representation are related to changes in the cultural and political contexts, through a critical engagement with Iser's argument that the institution of literature works through a 'constant crossing of the boundary between the real and the imaginary'. As an Australian icon, the fence image illustrates the continuing power of settler discourse; however, the literary reworkings of the fence story disclose new visions of identity and otherness.' (Author's abstract)
Visceral Life Patricia Anderson , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 259 2004; (p. 12-13)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
A Good Eye for a Strange Land John F. Williams , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 16 January no. 5259 2004; (p. 17)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
Vision Less Splendid Sally Blakeney , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 November vol. 121 no. 6400 2003; (p. 76)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
Silver Snap of an Old Land Peter Craven , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 29 November 2003; (p. 5)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
Home is Where the Camera Is Martin Thomas , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29-30 November 2003; (p. 14)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
Silver Snap of an Old Land Peter Craven , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 29 November 2003; (p. 5)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
Vision Less Splendid Sally Blakeney , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 November vol. 121 no. 6400 2003; (p. 76)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
A Good Eye for a Strange Land John F. Williams , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 16 January no. 5259 2004; (p. 17)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
Visceral Life Patricia Anderson , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 259 2004; (p. 12-13)

— Review of At Home in Australia Peter Conrad , 2003 single work prose
The Fence in Australian Short Fiction : 'A Constant Crossing of Boundaries'? Kieran Dolin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 141-153)
'This article contributes to discussions about the significance of fences in the Australian social imaginary. It undertakes a historical and intertextual reading of eight short stories that take the fence as their titular symbol, and explores how the fence story is rewritten at various moments of change in twentieth-century Australia. Developments in narrative form and representation are related to changes in the cultural and political contexts, through a critical engagement with Iser's argument that the institution of literature works through a 'constant crossing of the boundary between the real and the imaginary'. As an Australian icon, the fence image illustrates the continuing power of settler discourse; however, the literary reworkings of the fence story disclose new visions of identity and otherness.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 4 Dec 2003 10:08:02
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