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y separately published work icon Hyram and B. single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 Hyram and B.
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Hyram and B are friends for ever. Discarded by their owners, Hyram and B have lived on the top shelf of the toy shop for longer than anyone. Then a little girl buys B bear and takes him home. Will the two friends find each other again?

This collaboration with author Brian Caswell is a gentle story about the power of friendship for those who understand the secret language of friendship.

(from the illustrator's website http://mattottley.com/product/hyram-and-b/)

Exhibitions

9563074

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Politics of Picture Books : Stories of Displaced Children in Twenty-first-century Australia Mary Tomsic , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 15 no. 2 2018; (p. 339-356)

'This article uses cultural representations to write refugee history. It examines twenty-first-century picture books about displaced children, alongside published responses to them, to explore how refugee experiences and histories are constructed, both for and about children, in an Australian context. The visual literary form of picture books as political texts is examined as a space for discussion and dialogue. Published responses to them, however, more commonly reveal rigid interpretations of imagined readers, invoking binary divisions between displaced and non-displaced children. Through these sources, questions of humanisation and (de)politicisations in refugee history are considered.'  (Publication abstract)

Encouraging Empathy through Picture Books About Migration Kumarasinghe Dissanayake Mudiyanselage , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 75-91)

Reading children’s literature is often considered important for developing readers’ empathy towards others. Picture books that thematise cultural diversity and issues of cultural difference often affirm positive models of cultural harmony and tolerance, thereby providing young readers with exemplars of human rights and social justice. Since 2000, many picture books have responded to Australia’s changing policy regarding immigration, especially the impact on refugees and asylum seekers. This chapter will discuss how picture books targeted for primary aged children engage with the subjective experience of migration and encourage readers to take up an empathic position with regard to the plight of others as represented in the texts. Picture books discussed in this chapter will include recent examples that deal with Asian-Australian relations, refugees, and asylum seekers. The chapter will have direct relevance to the cross-curriculum priority ‘Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia’, and will include the general capabilities: ethical understanding and intercultural understanding.

Untitled Elizabeth Douglas , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 48 no. 1 2004; (p. 16)

— Review of Hyram and B. Brian Caswell , 2003 single work picture book
A Fine Line Sherryl Clark , 2003-2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January no. 257 2003-2004; (p. 64-65)

— Review of Hyram and B. Brian Caswell , 2003 single work picture book ; Two Summers John Heffernan , 2003 single work picture book ; Roos in Shoes Thomas Keneally , 2003 single work picture book ; My Gran's Different Sue Lawson , 2003 single work picture book ; The Violin Man Colin Thompson , 2003 single work picture book
Untitled Lucinda Dodds , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , November vol. 18 no. 5 2003; (p. 28)

— Review of Hyram and B. Brian Caswell , 2003 single work picture book
Untitled Lucinda Dodds , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , November vol. 18 no. 5 2003; (p. 28)

— Review of Hyram and B. Brian Caswell , 2003 single work picture book
A Fine Line Sherryl Clark , 2003-2004 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January no. 257 2003-2004; (p. 64-65)

— Review of Hyram and B. Brian Caswell , 2003 single work picture book ; Two Summers John Heffernan , 2003 single work picture book ; Roos in Shoes Thomas Keneally , 2003 single work picture book ; My Gran's Different Sue Lawson , 2003 single work picture book ; The Violin Man Colin Thompson , 2003 single work picture book
Untitled Elizabeth Douglas , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 48 no. 1 2004; (p. 16)

— Review of Hyram and B. Brian Caswell , 2003 single work picture book
Encouraging Empathy through Picture Books About Migration Kumarasinghe Dissanayake Mudiyanselage , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 75-91)

Reading children’s literature is often considered important for developing readers’ empathy towards others. Picture books that thematise cultural diversity and issues of cultural difference often affirm positive models of cultural harmony and tolerance, thereby providing young readers with exemplars of human rights and social justice. Since 2000, many picture books have responded to Australia’s changing policy regarding immigration, especially the impact on refugees and asylum seekers. This chapter will discuss how picture books targeted for primary aged children engage with the subjective experience of migration and encourage readers to take up an empathic position with regard to the plight of others as represented in the texts. Picture books discussed in this chapter will include recent examples that deal with Asian-Australian relations, refugees, and asylum seekers. The chapter will have direct relevance to the cross-curriculum priority ‘Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia’, and will include the general capabilities: ethical understanding and intercultural understanding.

The Politics of Picture Books : Stories of Displaced Children in Twenty-first-century Australia Mary Tomsic , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 15 no. 2 2018; (p. 339-356)

'This article uses cultural representations to write refugee history. It examines twenty-first-century picture books about displaced children, alongside published responses to them, to explore how refugee experiences and histories are constructed, both for and about children, in an Australian context. The visual literary form of picture books as political texts is examined as a space for discussion and dialogue. Published responses to them, however, more commonly reveal rigid interpretations of imagined readers, invoking binary divisions between displaced and non-displaced children. Through these sources, questions of humanisation and (de)politicisations in refugee history are considered.'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 6 Jun 2016 13:26:04
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